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Posts Tagged ‘Atkinson’

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, October 27, 1921

Burglars, believed to be operating with an automobile or light truck, broke into Gibbon’s store late Friday night or early Saturday morning and stole about $500 worth of merchandise of all description.

Tobacco, in the amount of $300, was the major portion of their loot. Other articles stolen include two sacks of sugar, all the hams and bacon, six pairs of shoes, socks, shirts, inner tubes, etc. Entrance was effected through a warehouse window. Deputy sheriffs are investigating. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, April 2, 1961

(This is the first in a series of articles which will appear from time to time about lost towns of King County.)

By Lucile McDonald

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Lost towns of King County rival in mystery the ghost towns of gold-mine country. The thing about them is that most have vanished without a trace—not so much as a weathered heap of timber or a false-front abandoned store to indicate that at this or that road junction stood a community of several hundred persons.

Any map of 50 years ago or more is sprinkled with place names where nothing to indicate a community exists today. Some of them were swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Others died from natural causes.

Who could find Taylor, Kerriston, Cedar Mountain, Sherwood, Eddyville, and Barneston today? Who would know about Henry’s Switch, Atkinson, Trude, Holmar, Herrick, Danville, and Durham?

Yet, these names remain on the map, monuments to another time, when coal mines and sawmills attracted population to the foothills of the Cascades. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 30, 1980

Maple Valley RR station
Maple Valley’s first railroad station, built in 1887 for the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company. The Milwaukee Road did not come through Maple Valley until 1907. Hence the station was evidently in a considerable different location than the two which replaced it.

At the time this photograph was taken, the track was narrow gauge, probably three feet between the rails, as compared to the standard gauge of 4 feet, 8 ½ inches in use on American railroads today. The Columbia and Puget Sound was purchased by the Pacific Coast Coal Company about 1897 and renamed the Pacific Coast Railroad.

It remained as such until the Burlington Northern merger in 1970, despite the face that in 1952 the Great Northern purchased the railroad and operated it as a separate company. (Photo courtest Maple Valley Historical Society.)

(Editor’s note: The Milwaukee Railroad ran its last train through Maple Valley on March 15 and a significant historical era ended. In this series of articles, beginning below, Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher, recalls the often turbulent past and, to many valleyites, the sad present.)

By Dave Sprau
Installment I

At 4 p.m., Friday, April 4, 1980, Burlington Northern Agent Ralph Ozura locked the door on the Maple Valley station and went home for the last time.

Unlike other days, no “night man“ showed up to relieve Ralph and keep the station operating on its previous 24-hour, seven-day-per-week basis. An era had ended. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Keith Watson

Bode Locomotive

Black Diamond began as a coal town and needed a way to transport the coal to the market place. The best route was to use the Maple Valley grade with the installation of railroad tracks that would serve Black Diamond and other coal mining areas.

The Black Diamond Coal Company, owner of the town of Black Diamond, was not in the train business. The owner of town of Franklin, 3 miles east of Black Diamond was, and from 1884 to 1885 proceeded to extend the railroad from Seattle, through Renton, through the Maple Valley, into Black Diamond and Franklin. They had to cross the Cedar River four times along the route building bridges as they advanced. They used horse power, up to 300 horses at a time, and many workers.

The first railroad to arrive in Black Diamond was called the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad; previously known as the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad. The rails were narrow gauge, 36 inches apart, from rail to rail, so the locomotives were small and of course used steam engines.

In those days it was common to name the locomotives along with a number as identification. Some of the names were: No. 1 A.A. Denny; No. 2 AL-Ki; No. 3 Geo. C Bode; No. 4 Georgina; and the numbers 5 thru 10 with no names just numbers. See the narrow gauge locomotive pictures. (more…)

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