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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 11, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Due to the potential impact the Muckleshoot Reservation amphitheater will have on the City of Black Diamond’s traffic, a resolution requesting the Army Corps of Engineers perform an environmental impact study that includes traffic flow was unanimously passed during the January 5 Council meeting.

Along with City Planner Jason Paulsen, Councilman Geoff Bowie drafted a resolution that would petition the Army Corp of Engineers to study whether or not the construction of the amphitheater in Auburn would affect traffic and emergency response time in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, January 16, 1995

Assessed property value climbing in remote areas

By Kevin Ebi
The News Tribune

Randy Hopper was transferred to his firm’s Tukwila office from San Diego, but he and his family have chosen to live in an Enumclaw subdivision to get away from the problems of city living. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune)

Last year, Randy Hopper received more than a promotion.

He got a new quality of life.

The promotion took his family from the bright lights of San Diego to the rural life of Enumclaw.

Hopper, who didn’t want his job or employer revealed, is part of a trend being seen in Enumclaw and other rural cities in the county. It’s a trend of growth.

Even though the King County real estate boom ended in 1990, areas such as Black Diamond, Carnation, Duvall, Enumclaw, and North Bend continue to grow in value. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, January 14, 2001

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Dan O’Brien/Journal

BLACK DIAMOND — There is a dancing light in the woods that offers a respite from the deep damp of winter.

Nestled beneath a snag forest of trunks and branches covered with moss, a rock pit glimmers in the late afternoon at the state park south of here. Not far away, the Green River rushes; Christy Creek gurgles closer.

The flaming geyser of Flaming Geyser State Park is a sprightly flame of methane gas 8 to 12 inches high that undulates atop a concrete pad. The wind sometimes blows it out, but the methane keeps on coming from deep underground, where fractured rivers of coal millions of years old still lie. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 31, 1925

Every miner at Black Diamond probably knows the three men whose likenesses appear above. If there is one who doesn’t, he should. They represent the three phases of coal mining most vital to the industry; efficiency and economy in operation, safety inspection, and first aid and mine rescue training.

In Supt. Paul Gallagher largely rests the success or failure of the mine’s operation. Closely related is the safety inspection, directed by Deputy State Mine Inspector, Geo. T. Wake, under the able supervision of Wm. R. Reese, Chief Inspector. And last but not least is John G. Schoning, of the United States Bureau of Mines, who patiently drills the men in the principles of first aid and mine rescue work. All three indispensable. (more…)

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