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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 13, 1908

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

The above is a picture of the undefeated Black Diamond baseball team, winners of fourteen straight games. They have defeated teams from Enumclaw, Auburn, Newcastle, and some of the fastest amateur teams of Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Text and photos from the Howard A. Hanson Dam dedication program, May 12, 1962

Eagle Gorge Dam was renamed Howard A. Hanson by an act of Congress 28 July 1958, introduced by Congressman Thomas M. Pelly, and signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower 6 August 1958.

Many people worked long and hard to establish a flood-control project on the Green River in King County of Western Washington. One of these was Howard A. Hanson.

In addition to his many prior years of personal effort, he was, from 1947 until his death on 4 November 1957, a leader of civic and government groups actively seeking construction of the project. He organized and directed effective action leading to contributions by the state and King County totaling $2,000.000. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

About a mile and a quarter southeasterly from Franklin and about the same distance due east from the entrance to the Pacosco Mine, is the Hyde Mine.

The Hyde Mine was originally developed by sinking a slope on Number Twelve Seam, then later a rock tunnel was driven connecting this slope with the well-known McKay Seam. This mine was opened prior to 1909, but was not extensively developed until the McKay Coal Seam was found, which was a year or two later.

Gangways were driven to the north and to the northwest, toward what is now Pacosco Mine, and gangways were also driven to the south along the strikes of both the McKay and the Number Twelve. (more…)

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