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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 9, 1925

Probably the youngest First Aid Team in the world, the Black Diamond Midgets, ranging in age from 7 to 9 years, were a feature attraction at the Independence Day celebration in Black Diamond. The boys are training for an exhibition drill at the State Meet to be held July 25. Johnny Gallagher is captain of the team, the other members including Roy Hale, Jimmy Nicholson, Oliver Rouse, Harold Lloyd, Bennie Hughes, and Elmon Rouse. Harold Lloyd, Sr., is the instructor. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 22, 1913

1913 Buick touring car

Last Sunday morning Phillip Smyly, sales manager of the Buick Automobile Company in Seattle, started out in the general direction of Green River Valley. The trip lasted two and a one-half days and resulted in Smyly’s landing orders for four Buicks. He covered close to 400 miles on his jaunt, which took him through Kent, Auburn, Black Diamond, and other towns in that vicinity.

In Black Diamond he met a prospective buyer who said his order depended on whether the car could take a capacity load over Brooks Hill, a long, steep grade near the town that is notorious for its immunity from attacks by motor vehicles.

Smyly acquiesced, and to make the bargain good he added a sixth passenger. The manner in which the powerful little Buick ascended the grade made the Black Diamond man gasp. He remarked that “no car had done it before,” and then drew forth his checkbook. The notations he made on the paper made him the owner of a new touring car and Salesman Smyly smiled sweetly.

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Originally published in the King County Journal, June 2001

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Black Diamond is a small town located 35 miles southeast of Seattle, east of Auburn, and south of Maple Valley. It was established more than 100 years ago when a wealth of coal was discovered. The town’s name came from the Black Diamond Coal Company of California, which began mining in the area in the 1880s. (more…)

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Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

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