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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 1, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Jim Bolton

Jim Bolton

Black Diamond Elementary School has a new principal. He is Jim Bolton, who with a warm and engaging smile states of his new job, “I’ve found a home.”

In addition to the Black Diamond School, he also serves as principal at Selleck School. Born and raised in Buckley, Jim received his master’s degree in special education from Central Washington State College (now a university).

Bolton served last year as acting principal at Southwood Elementary in Enumclaw, a year which fulfilled the requirement of a year’s internship for a potential school administrator. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, October 31, 1973

By our county news bureau

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The city of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The City of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A sewerage system planned but dropped three or four years ago is once more underway, county officials announced this week.

The area to be served by the projected $1 million system is east of Auburn at Black Diamond, Lake Morton, and Lake Sawyer, where pollution problems have been increasing due to inadequate septic tank drain fields and growing population pressures. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 28, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

In September 1925 the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article about Flaming Geyser Park and its unique gas-bubbling spring. At that time it was a privately-owned facility providing campsites, stoves, restrooms, a swimming pool fed by the Green River, fish hatchery, and round picnic tables cut from six-foot sections of fir trees. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 25, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Two daughters of the late Rev. Honor L. Wilhelm‚ have been going through the trunks, papers, library, and attic in a 70-year-old house at 2258 W. 61st St. trying to place in some sort of order the literary legacy of a one-time Seattle publisher.

Mr. Wilhelm, who died May 21, edited The Coast magazine from 1902 to 1910.

Mrs. Wilhelm, unable to move around much because of a hip injury, was aided by her daughters, Helen (Mrs. Arvid Sagor) of 2148 N. 63rd St. and Margaret (Mrs. Ronald L. Cripe) of Enumclaw in closing the house, which was to be sold.

In the 40 years the Wilhelms lived in it the dwelling gradually filled with the owner’s literary output. Mr. Wilhelm wrote poems for every occasion. He wrote autobiographies from his boyhood. He edited several publications. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 18, 1928

Vacationist may find ideal spot less than hour’s drive from Seattle—if he looks closely

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

No wonder the Eastern visitor to the Northwest exclaims at the wonderful scenery and wealth of lakes and rivers that abound here. It is beyond the understanding of most of us who have lived here for the greater part of our lives.

The outstanding feature, according to some of the tourists is the places in which one will find a bevy of lakes. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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