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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 2, 1925

William Rose is fatally wounded during battle between citizens and desperadoes in Pierce County

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

In a revolver duel which followed the first bank robbery in the history of the town of Buckley, forty miles southeast of Seattle, in Pierce County, yesterday afternoon, two unmasked, unidentified desperadoes died “with their boots on,” and William Rose, 54 years old, business man of Buckley, was fatally wounded. Rose died in the Taylor-Lacey Hospital in Auburn at 8:15 o’clock this morning.

One of the bandits was shot from the running board of an automobile speeding away with the loot. The other was killed when he drove back for the body of his dead companion. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 22, 1977

By Michael Prager
Times South Bureau

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

BLACK DIAMOND — Not far from the Black Diamond home of Jules Dal Santo, the Green River plunges down a magnificent gorge.

A mantelpiece to what Dal Santo and other locals call “God’s country,” the Green River Gorge is at once beautiful, rugged, and treacherous.

Each year, hundreds of people visit the gorge. They come for many reasons—fishing, canoeing, swimming, or just plain sightseeing.

But each year, the fun and beauty of the gorge are marred. Death and injury, too, are frequent visitors. Dal Santo should know.

It’s Dal Santo’s job as Black Diamond’s assistant fire chief to help rescue those whose fun turns against them.

“Broken legs, arms, necks, drownings, you name it,” the 61-year-old Dal Santo said, recalling 31 years of experience in search-and-rescue efforts on the river. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 19, 1974

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

A new community is springing to life in the Lake Morton area south of Black Diamond and enthusiasm among its backers is increasing by the day, all reports seem to indicate.

The 28-square-mile area encompassed by the community of Lake Heights extends roughly from Horseshoe Lake and the county’s Lake Sawyer Park on the north, Highway 18 on the south, 164th Place S.E. on the west, and the Green River on the east. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 26, 1906

Only fair weather necessary to make Georgetown firemen’s picnic a great success

A fair day is all that is necessary to make the gathering of the volunteer fire departments of the region at Georgetown tomorrow the most successful affair of its kind ever held hereabouts. The three Rainier fire companies of Georgetown and the citizens have been arranging for the big picnic and hose-cart run at Lincoln Park on a magnificent scale. Thousands are expected to attend.

The loving cup presented by the citizens of the town will be contested for by teams from Columbia City, Kent, Renton, Black Diamond, Enumclaw, Auburn, and the Georgetown companies. There may be other entries made before tomorrow.

A smaller cup will be competed for by the three Rainier companies. It was presented by Cashier C.H. Upper of the Georgetown Bank.

A parade will take place shortly after noon and the balance of the day will be given over to the picnic and its program of entertainment. The plans provide that the winner of the big loving cup shall hold a similar event next year at the town where that company holds forth. The cup must be won two years in succession before it becomes the permanent property of any company.

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