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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, January 11, 1999

By Linda Woo

Bob Burdick, 87, helps Sawyer Woods Elementary fifth-grader Sara Martin, 11, with her reading. Each Wednesday, Burdick brings his Scottish terrier with him to greet and help students and staff. He began volunteering seven years ago at Grass Lake Elementary, where his daughter taught kindergarten. (Gary Kissel/Journal)

Bob Burdick, 87, helps Sawyer Woods Elementary fifth-grader Sara Martin, 11, with her reading. Each Wednesday, Burdick brings his Scottish terrier with him to greet and help students and staff. He began volunteering seven years ago at Grass Lake Elementary, where his daughter taught kindergarten. (Gary Kissel/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND—Bob Burdick’s three children are grown with grandchildren of their own, but many students in South County schools love him like a grandfather.

Every Wednesday, Burdick and Schautze, his black Scottish terrier, faithfully shows up at Sawyer Woods Elementary School to greet and help students and staff members. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1913

AUBURN, Tuesday, Aug. 26. — Black Diamond members of the local of the United Mine Workers of America are meeting this afternoon to decide whether to call off the strike that has been on here for the last two and a half weeks. (more…)

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