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Posts Tagged ‘Auburn’

Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1913

AUBURN, Tuesday, Aug. 26. — Black Diamond members of the local of the United Mine Workers of America are meeting this afternoon to decide whether to call off the strike that has been on here for the last two and a half weeks. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 16, 1920

The Maple Valley grade school was built in 1920.

The Maple Valley grade school was built in 1920.

We have 19,196 census children in the count outside Seattle, an increase of 1,755 over last year; our enrollment will be about 16,000. To keep up with this rapid growth on limited school finances has given our boards of directors a great deal of work in providing sufficient facilities, arranging for transportation, and the selection of additional teaching force.

New buildings have been built during the summer or are under way at Auburn, Maple Valley, Bellevue, Black Diamond, Orillia, Kent, Edgewood, Star Lake, North Bend, Veazie, Honey Creek, and Duvall.

At other places buildings have been enlarged or portables erected to take care of the increase in school population, so we can say the year opens with a qualified teacher in every school room, adequate housing facilities for every child, and with every community anxious and willing to give the fullest support to public education. We are at the threshold of a successful school year.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, August 9, 1912

In anticipation of labor trouble at the mines in Western Washington from which it obtains its fuel supply, the Northern Pacific is storing 45,000 tons of coal at its Puget Sound terminals.

A pile of 15,000 tons of coal has been accumulated at Seattle and 30,000 tons more are being stored at Auburn, 20 miles south of here, where the transcontinental line connects with the coast line.

The Chicago Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway, the Great Northern, and the Oregon–Washington Railroad and Navigation Company burn oil on most of their lines in Washington and would not be affected by a strike in the mines.

The agreement between the operators and the miners ends September 1. Agents of the union and the operator are conducting negotiations for a new agreement and labor leaders predict that all differences will be adjusted satisfactorily.

Three hundred men employed in the mine at Bayne went on strike a month ago and are still out.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 8, 1924

Everywhere in the mines of Western Washington, and particularly in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, there is much stress placed on safety work. As a result the number of serious accidents is kept down to a minimum.

This scene shows the precautions taken to support the roof while the miner operates the “slugger” in undercutting the coal. As he prefers not to reveal his identity, we leave it to you to guess the name of this “Safety First” miner. (more…)

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