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Posts Tagged ‘Austrian’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, February 1999

Photographed on their home place in Hobart are Valentine Kochevar (in hat) and his children: Antonia, Mary, Eddie, Joey, Anne, and Christine. Another child, Aloysius (Louie) died in 1928.

Photographed on their home place in Hobart are Valentine Kochevar (in hat) and his children: Antonia, Mary, Eddie, Joey, Anne, and Christine. Another child, Aloysius (Louie) died in 1928.

The latest publication by the Maple Valley Historical Society is the “Kochevar Family Recipes and Remembrances.” The 104-page cookbook contains old family recipes and history of the immigrant Kochevar family as well as an ancestor chart.

Father Valentine, who was born on Valentine’s Day 1874, in Austria (Slovenia) in what is now Yugoslavia, came to the United States in 1903. He worked in Black Diamond, logged in Enumclaw, then went to Ravensdale and Taylor, before settling in Hobart. He married Antonia Zagridisnik, also an immigrant, and they raised seven children.

All of the children, except Joe and Louie, are still living. Annie makes her home on the original farm purchased by her father in 1913. The other children were Mary, Antonia, Christine, and Edward, the only child born in Hobart. The rest were born in Taylor. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 10, 1910

One of the rescuers, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday.

One of the rescuers at the Lawson Mine, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday on November 6, 1910.

It usually requires a tragedy to bring the majority to a realization of the seriousness of any trivial affair—to a proper appreciation of the monotonous services which are daily rendered by brave and faithful servants of our everyday system of life.

Such a tragedy as that which occurred at Black Diamond on Sunday morning has, we trust, brought such a realization of the bravery and devotion of the men who go down into the earth day by day to mine the coal which warms our bodies, cooks our food, supplies our light, and speeds us on our way homeward.

In these days most of these men are foreigners—members of an alien race—but that does not diminish their due of praise or their credit in the way of our gratitude.

The open mouth of a coal mine has swallowed up many a young and promising life. Even if the youthful miner be spared a violent death in some such explosion as that which occurred in the Lawson mine on Sunday morning, the chances are that he will succumb in the end to “miners’ consumption,” pneumonia, or the terrors of the dark, underground chambers in which he works. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, March 14, 1990

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Around the turn of the century, Paul Kos left his wife and family behind in Yugoslavia (then Austria-Hungary) to find a better life in America. He came to the coal mines in Ravensdale, south of Issaquah.

The first words Kos learned in English were “hurry up!” Working 10 hour-days for $2.50 a day it took him five years to save up enough to bring Rose and the two oldest children over.

In 1912, the family moved to Issaquah to take advantage of the town’s coal boom. Single miners lived in rooming houses or in the tent city along the creek, but the Kos family bought the “horseshoe” house at First Avenue NE and Bush Street. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 10, 1978

By Eric Pyrne
South Times bureau

Joe Bertelli” ‘I fought all my life…’

Joe Bertelli” ‘I fought all my life…’

BLACK DIAMOND — The continuing drama of the nation-wide coal miners’ strike is being played out a little differently in this sleepy old town.

Black Diamond is the home of the only coal mine in the state whose workers still are represented by the United Mine Workers of America. The local miners joined their union brothers in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and other states in walking off their jobs when the strike was called three months ago.

They’re still out. But the situation in Black Diamond today doesn’t have much in common with the headline-grabbing developments back East.

There is no picketing, no violence and little rhetoric here. Labor and management have nothing but kind words for one another. And, since Washington, unlike the East, doesn’t rely extensively on union coal for energy, what happens in Black Diamond probably won’t matter much to most people. (more…)

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