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Posts Tagged ‘Bagley Seam’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 15, 1928

The A.A. Denny No. 1. One of the earliest types of locomotives used on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. This was a Mason-Fairlie engine with an outside valve known as a monkey motion. Many of this type were used on the Denver & Rio Grande in the early days.

The A.A. Denny No. 1. One of the earliest types of locomotives used on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. This was a Mason-Fairlie engine with an outside valve known as a monkey motion. Many of this type were used on the Denver & Rio Grande in the early days.

The slogan “Seattle Spirit” is familiar to everyone in the great Northwest. I might say that its origin has been a mystery up to this issue. (more…)

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