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Posts Tagged ‘bakeries’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 3, 1996

Jim Storer of CJ's Bakery in Black Diamond is showing off some of the baked goods that he has prepared and are ready for the oven. We can all smell the aroma and can't wait to taste all the goodies.

Jim Storer of CJ’s Bakery in Black Diamond is showing off some of the baked goods that he has prepared and are ready for the oven. We can all smell the aroma and can’t wait to taste all the goodies.

“Look! Right there behind the glass counter! Could it be?! Yes … I do believe it’s … real New York style cheesecake!”

Several months ago, Black Diamond got wind of the news that the Black Diamond Sports Shop was moving just down the road, and that their old building would be home to CJ’s Bakery. For weeks, folks salivated when passing the “Open Soon” sign. Then, just seven weeks ago, the irresistible aroma of freshly baked bread wafting out the front door announced the wait was over. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 6, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

All the fuss about the Mariners, Seattle’s new major league ball team is okay, according to Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond, but to him the familiar cry of “Play Ball” has a new meaning. It brings back memories of “Sand Lot” baseball and pleasant thoughts of bygone days in this area. Baseball was a popular and important sport in the mining towns that once dotted the area. The above picture of “Duda” and his “spring swing” was taken in 1923.

All the fuss about the Mariners, Seattle’s new major league ball team is okay, according to Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond, but to him the familiar cry of “Play Ball” has a new meaning. It brings back memories of “Sand Lot” baseball and pleasant thoughts of bygone days in this area. Baseball was a popular and important sport in the mining towns that once dotted the area. The above picture of “Duda” and his “spring swing” was taken in 1923.

As the cry “Play Ball” echoes across the land, baseball enthusiasts all throughout Puget Sound country are greatly excited about the Seattle Mariners, newly formed Major League expansion team. But that familiar cry has a different meaning for Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond … it means “Sand Lot” and pleasant memories of bygone days.

As Duda recalls, in the 1920s baseball was an important and popular sport in all the mining towns that dotted the area. At that time there were four teams in Black Diamond plus the “big team,” the Pacific Coast League Briquettes.

Commonly called sand lots, they were actually only cleared areas in the fields approximately 100 by 150 feet. He laughed as he told us some of the problems encountered.

At that time Black Diamond had no “herd laws” and many families had milk cows which were allowed to graze freely during the spring and summer months.

The cows enjoyed resting in these cleared fields which retained the warmth of the sun into the night, and the constant ding-ding of their bells was a familiar sound. The results? We can only say the baseball teams had some problems the Mariners won’t have to contend with in the Kingdome. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, March 31, 1905

Van Buren Madden, who drives the Buckley Bakery wagon, was held up and robbed while returning from Franklin on Wednesday afternoon, by a couple of Negroes.

Bob Hodge was “a monster of man – at least we thought he was,” remembered Carl Steiert in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories. “He was about 6-foot-4 and weighed well over 200 pounds.”

Bob Hodge was “a monster of man – at least we thought he was,” remembered Carl Steiert in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories. “He was about 6-foot-4 and weighed well over 200 pounds.”

Madden had collected quite a sum of money from his customers and started for home. About a mile this side of Franklin two masked men stepped out from the brush at the road-side, and pointing a gun at him, demanded that he get down from the wagon. They then went through his pockets, taking about one hundred dollars and a gold watch.

Madden was then ordered to get into the wagon and drive on without looking back, under penalty of death. While he was being searched the mask slipped from the face of one of the robbers, and Madden recognized him as one whom he had frequently seen about the town during his trips to Franklin.

Madden came on to Enumclaw and phoned for Mr. Theroux, the proprietor of the bakery at Buckley, and together they returned to search for the robbers. Deputy Sheriff Hodge of Black Diamond at once knew who the robbers were from the description and notified the police at Seattle.

Fifteen minutes after word was received, officers arrested Chas. Roberts and Ed. Spencer, who proved to be the men wanted. The watch and over half the money were recovered.

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