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Posts Tagged ‘bakery’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 5, 1995

What the hell has happened to Black Diamond’s business district?

Last Saturday afternoon, my mother asked me to stop by the bakery for a loaf of date-nut bread but, owing to the new buildings and the crowd of big-city retirees and Yuppies, I could hardly find the place.

The two blocks of South Railroad Avenue were so congested with traffic and pedestrians it was difficult to find a parking place.

Of course, the Black Diamond bakery has attracted tourists ever since it opened early in the century, but there’s never been so many Seattle and Bellevue folks seeking a little country serenity—a goal that quickly evaporates in such a crowd. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 1, 2003

By Jon Hahn

Jim and Candace Storer have enjoyed creating delicious treats at their bakery in Black Diamond. They have owned the store since 1995.

Black Diamond bakers’ hours don’t bother Jim Storer because he’s always been an early riser.

Before he was old enough to clean his father’s Kent bakery before and after school, he was up before dawn to deliver a Seattle Post-Intelligencer paper route.

Nowadays he’s up and working well before the 4 a.m. opening of his CJs Bakery on the north edge of Black Diamond. “We don’t mind being ‘the other Black Diamond bakery,'” he said, referring to the older and more widely known bakery and restaurant in the heart of this community’s old downtown. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 24, 2009

By Kathleen Kear

Community members and guests filled Black Diamond Community Center where they enjoyed a kickoff event celebrating Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary of being a city. — Photos by Ron Olness.

Quickly running through their regular city council meeting agenda on Thursday, February 19, at the Black Diamond Community Center, Mayor Howard Botts—along with Mayor Pro Tem Rebecca Olness and Councilmembers Goeff Bowie, Bill Boston, Leih Mulvihill, and Kristine Hanson—turned his attention to the kickoff event that will begin a year-long celebration of Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary as a city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, February 19, 1998

Bill would give Black Diamond permit it has been denied 3 times

By Leslie Brown
The News Tribune

Black Diamond development: Black Diamond Associates’ 1,600-home development would sit on 750 acres recently annexed by the city. The project is on hold because the city doesn’t have enough water. (Ronnie Ashlock/The News Tribune)

After failing at every level to obtain a water permit for 1,600 new homes in Black Diamond, developers finally have found a sympathetic and powerful ear in the Legislature.

A bill that would give the City of Black Diamond a “temporary” water permit—the very one the state Ecology Department denied developers three years ago passed the House 55-42 last week. It is now pending before the Senate.

Critics are decrying House Bill 2800, sponsored by Rep. Jack Cairnes (R-Covington) as special-interest legislation, bad water policy, and an end-run around a three-tiered administrative process that gave the developers ample review.

“This bill is not really intended to secure a (water) supply for the existing population of the area,” Ecology Department water resources manager Keith Phillips wrote to the House Agriculture and Ecology Committee. “Rather, it is intended to secure a supply for a large, new land development nearby.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, January 28, 1994

Around the Valley by Mary Swift

The yeast he could do—Doug Weiding never figured on becoming a baker

Doug Weiding in a ‘special’ booth at the Black Diamond Bakery. Valley Daily News photo by Garry Kissel.

Weiding, a former food broker salesman, was actually in the market for a tavern.

Then the tavern deal fell through and the opportunity to buy the historic Black Diamond Bakery rose before him, an opportunity as delicious as sweet dough in a warm oven.

The year was 1985.

Weiding tied on an apron and became baker. (more…)

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