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Posts Tagged ‘bakery’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the King County Journal, June 2001

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Black Diamond is a small town located 35 miles southeast of Seattle, east of Auburn, and south of Maple Valley. It was established more than 100 years ago when a wealth of coal was discovered. The town’s name came from the Black Diamond Coal Company of California, which began mining in the area in the 1880s. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 27, 1974

By D’Ann Pedee

It’s a family affair—but not the Bob, Carol, Ted, and Alice type.

“A Family Affair” is a leather goods and handcraft shop in the heart of Morganville—the small suburb of Black Diamond reached by turning right at the Black Diamond coal car.

Once you’ve found it, you’ll be glad you used the gas if you’re at all interested in handmade leather items.

Helen Reid, her son, Jack, and two daughters all have a hand in creating and custom designing belts, wallets, handbags, hair ornaments—anything that can be made of leather. They have accepted personalized projects ranging from police belts to dog and cat collars and will soon be able to do tack items such as harnesses. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 2, 1977

In part through the efforts of Black Diamond City Councilwoman Freddie Shaw and concerned citizen Frank Zumek, Black Diamond will currently have Metro bus service to Seattle and Southcenter every Tuesday.

Freddie and Frank recently appeared on KOMO television to discuss the problems of Metro service for our city. The Tuesday bus will pick up at both the bakery and the café at approximately 9:30 and 4:35 and will depart Seattle at 3:15.

Further information is available at the city hall, 886-2560. (more…)

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