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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 5, 1925

Near the foot of Queen Anne Hill, corner of Taylor Avenue and Roy Street, P.J. Emt has a coal yard to which he is attracting city-wide attention. Some time ago he erected at one corner of the yard an exact replica of a fireplace, with a brick chimney, basket grate, and tile front.

Grouped before the grate are two settees upon which are often seated numbers of the neighborhood children, while before them blazes cheerily a fire of Diamond Briquets. This fire lasts all through the night, so that workmen going to their tasks before dawn, have commented upon the lasting qualities of a fuel which, hours later, still glows so brightly as they pass. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 1994

By Heather Larson

Left to right: Jennifer Simmons, Danny Simmons, and Ashley Petersen prepare to enter the parade route in their horse-drawn wagon representing Four Corners Safeway.

Black Diamond celebrated Labor Day weekend with a fever this year. After having last year’s event cancelled for lack of volunteers, no holds were barred. Something for everyone was offered during the 4 days from a fish dinner on Friday night to a bed race on Sunday and a parade down the Maple Valley Highway on Monday.

On Saturday amid torrential downpours the Black Diamond Police challenged the Black Diamond Fire Department to a softball game. Since the police, who chose to be called the DARE Devils, didn’t have the manpower to field a team, other police officers who live in Black Diamond were asked to help out. So King County, Bellevue, and Seattle Police Departments were also represented on the team.

According to Black Diamond officer Glenn Dickson, the highlight of the game was the 8-foot mud pit behind first base.

It was really wet and muddy, but a good time was had by all, said Dickson.

The DARE Devils beat the Hosers 13 to 9 at the first annual baseball game. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, April 23, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

For 47 years, Black Diamond’s Labor Day celebration has displayed the essence of a close-knit small town.

There were three-legged races. A greased-pole climb. A shoe-kicking contest. And a parade everyone in the community could join—and did.

But this year, organizers are afraid there might be no three-day Labor Day celebration. Only three people came to the last organizational meeting, said Lorianne Taff, who was there.

Taff moved to Black Diamond less than two years ago.

“I fell in love with the town and the charm of the town, and I want to see it preserved,” Taff said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

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