Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Bayne’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 27, 1935

Coal mines in the Enumclaw district were stilled this week with the announcement of the nationwide soft coal miners strike. The local union members joined in the nationwide strike and about 2,000 miners in this state are now on strike. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, August 9, 1912

In anticipation of labor trouble at the mines in Western Washington from which it obtains its fuel supply, the Northern Pacific is storing 45,000 tons of coal at its Puget Sound terminals.

A pile of 15,000 tons of coal has been accumulated at Seattle and 30,000 tons more are being stored at Auburn, 20 miles south of here, where the transcontinental line connects with the coast line.

The Chicago Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway, the Great Northern, and the Oregon–Washington Railroad and Navigation Company burn oil on most of their lines in Washington and would not be affected by a strike in the mines.

The agreement between the operators and the miners ends September 1. Agents of the union and the operator are conducting negotiations for a new agreement and labor leaders predict that all differences will be adjusted satisfactorily.

Three hundred men employed in the mine at Bayne went on strike a month ago and are still out.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 10, 1924

Recently the Bulletin photographer succeeded in holding a group of men ready to board the man trip for a shift in Black Diamond Mine, by promising that the picture obtained would be published in the Bulletin. The gang of husky appearing miners and underground workmen seen above was the result. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »