Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Bellevue’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 15, 1911

Quarterly apportionment made to various districts of King County

M.E. Durham, deputy county superintendent, yesterday completed the last quarterly apportionment to the various school districts of the county. The total amount distributed was $580,572.55, of which $314,662.19 was from the state fund and $265,909.86 from the county fund. The apportionment was 7.6 cents per day’s attendance and $75 per teacher employed.

Those districts receiving more than $1,200 were: Seattle, $46,394; Renton, $9,160; Kent, $8,327; Auburn, $7,935; Foster, $4,740; Enumclaw, $4,175; Black Diamond, $4,035; Bothell, $3,918; Oak Lake, $3,805; Issaquah, $3,124; Ravensdale, $2,084; Richmond, $1,989; Kennydale, $1,833; Bellevue, $1,779; Kirkland, $1,700; Newcastle, $1,676; Redmond, $1,601; North Bend, $1,518; Des Moines, $1,520; Fall City, $1,337; Pacific, $1,218.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Journal-American, April 9, 1990

By Leslee Jaquette
Journal Eastside Bureau

Douglas C. Samuels (left), one of the owners of Pacific States Marketing Co. and president of Pacific States Mortgage Co., Robert Olsson, the other owner of Pacific States Marketing Co. and vice president, Pacific States Mortgage Corp.; and Jack L. McIntosh, president of M&H Development, examining map of the Black Diamond area where M&H plans to develop a “Bridle Trails” theme estate. Photo by Leslee Jaquette.

BELLEVUE — M&H Development Co., Inc. of Bellevue has acquired a 410-acre, $2.8 million tract adjacent to Black Diamond which will be developed into a “Bridle Trails” theme estate.

Jack L. McIntosh, president, says up to 82, five-acre tracts will be developed on the plateau parcel which fronts Black Diamond Lake and stretches to the north edge of the Flaming Geysers State Park. The developer foresees $500,000 to $1 million homes will be built on $150,000 lots available through both builder and public sale. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 5, 1995

What the hell has happened to Black Diamond’s business district?

Last Saturday afternoon, my mother asked me to stop by the bakery for a loaf of date-nut bread but, owing to the new buildings and the crowd of big-city retirees and Yuppies, I could hardly find the place.

The two blocks of South Railroad Avenue were so congested with traffic and pedestrians it was difficult to find a parking place.

Of course, the Black Diamond bakery has attracted tourists ever since it opened early in the century, but there’s never been so many Seattle and Bellevue folks seeking a little country serenity—a goal that quickly evaporates in such a crowd. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 20, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

Pacific Coast Coal Co. morning shift poses sitting on electric engines and empty coal cars outside the boarding house in Rainbow Town. The coal bunkers are in the background with the small hose-coal bunker to the right of the rear of the line of coal cars. A track straightener is in the foreground. — 1909 Asahel Curtis photo, courtesy of the Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma, and Bill Kombol, Palmer Coking Coal Co.

Milt Swanson is a historical treasure. He is a walking, talking encyclopedia with fascinating tales of his home town Newcastle/Coal Creek. He’s lived on the same piece of property for 84 years in a company house, on top of a mine shaft and next to the former company hotel and saloon. Across the street was Finn Town and the up the hill was Red Town.

He said when he was a kid, his pals and him named the various areas of the mining camp. The houses on the hill were red, so that was “Red Town”; closer to him the houses were white so naturally that was “White Town” and the area with all different colors was “Rainbow Village.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 1, 1991

Rural stronghold faces onslaught of new building

By John H. Stevens
Times South bureau

Some Black Diamond residents wonder if development is compatible with the area’s coal mining operations. Chien-Chi Chang/Seattle Times

BLACK DIAMOND—This sleepy little town in the Cascade foothills is about to have a population explosion, and Robert Murphy knows why.

Murphy, a Seattle homebuilder, has come all the way out here to put up six houses in the middle of town because the lots are cheap, and the Black Diamond government receptive.

“It doesn’t take any time at all to get a permit here,” Murphy says. “It’s one of the last receptive areas to growth in King County—a little oasis.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 11, 1926

Two monster Diamond Briquets, each weighing more than 200 pounds, proved a great drawing card in the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s booth at the Southwest Washington Manufacturers’ Exposition held in Tacoma last week.

A guessing contest was held, a ton of Diamond Briquets being the prize for the person guessing closest to the actual weight of the monster briquet shown on the mantlepiece. More than 3,000 guesses were recorded. J.F. Torrence is the manager of the Tacoma agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The News Tribune, January 16, 1995

Assessed property value climbing in remote areas

By Kevin Ebi
The News Tribune

Randy Hopper was transferred to his firm’s Tukwila office from San Diego, but he and his family have chosen to live in an Enumclaw subdivision to get away from the problems of city living. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune)

Last year, Randy Hopper received more than a promotion.

He got a new quality of life.

The promotion took his family from the bright lights of San Diego to the rural life of Enumclaw.

Hopper, who didn’t want his job or employer revealed, is part of a trend being seen in Enumclaw and other rural cities in the county. It’s a trend of growth.

Even though the King County real estate boom ended in 1990, areas such as Black Diamond, Carnation, Duvall, Enumclaw, and North Bend continue to grow in value. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Kent News Journal, January 4, 1985

By Pat Jenkins
Staff Reporter

Move over, coal. Hydroelectricity wants to be the new industry on the block in Black Diamond.

It might never happen, but a proposal by private investors to build a hydroelectric generating plant near the Green River and put Black Diamond in the electricity business has the attention of officials in a city that’s famous for its coal-mining history. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »