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Posts Tagged ‘Bellingham’

Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 24, 1900

Black Diamond miners have failed to find their dead companion’s remains

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

The Black Diamond coal miners are working to find the body of their comrade, T.A. Davis, who was buried in the mine at the time of the explosion Wednesday morning. They are digging night and day to reach the pocket where his body is supposed to be, but up to last night had failed to reach it.

During the search for the dead miner’s body all work on Mine No. 14, in which the explosion occurred, has been suspended, and the workmen in shifts are digging through the barrier of rock and coal to the head of the breast where Davis is believed to be entombed. They will keep at their labors night and day until they find the remains. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 10, 1924

Newcastle ‘Babettes’ win over long-tressed rivals

Hundreds of coal miners and their families cheer participants as Bellingham wins event

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Bellingham and Newcastle divided first honors in the largest first aid and mine rescue meeting ever staged in the state at Carbonado yesterday when twenty-five teams, representing six coal mining towns, competed in contests held under the auspices of the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Association.

About a thousand persons, most of them coal miners and members of their families from the competing camps, witnessed the contests and cheered the participants with all the enthusiasm of spectators at a big field and track meet. The meet is an annual affair, staged by the mine operators and coal mine workers.

Bellingham took first prize in the mine rescue contest, in which interest centered not only because an efficient mine rescue team is the pride of every coal camp and its main dependence in case of mine disaster, but also because such contests are spectacular to a degree. Newcastle was second and Carbonado third. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 21, 1920

Increases of from 19 cents to $1.40 a ton coming, says fuel dealer

Increases ranging from 19 cents to $1.94 in the cost of coal a ton in Seattle will ultimately be one result of the United States Railway Labor Board wage award of $600,000,000 to railway employees, said Harvey S. Jordan, commissioner of the Retail Fuel Dealers’ Association, today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 28, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

On the northwestern slope of Mt. Baker, a few miles south of the boundary line between United States and Canada, is a deposit of coal measures containing lenses of very good quality of anthracite coal. In addition to the anthracite, outcrops of high grade bituminous coals have also been found.

The area in which these coal outcrops occur is mountainous and forms the high foothills of the western slope of the Cascade Mountains. The district is drained by the Nooksack River and its tributaries, Glacier and Cornell creeks.

To date no one can state definitely the extent of these coal deposits, but they evidently cover eight or ten square miles and probably more. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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