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Posts Tagged ‘Bellingham’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 7, 1925

Before sailing for the four thousand mile trip to Japan, where they will act as a convoy to Lieut. Col. Pedro L. Zanni, intrepid Argentine army aviator, the two 100-foot North Sea trawlers shown in the halftone above, called at the bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Seattle to load fuel for the hazardous voyage.

The two staunch little vessels are the Canada and the Imbricaria, both of which have been chartered by the Argentine government to patrol the route across the Pacific recently followed by the globe-girdling American army flyers. This will be the course which Col. Zanni will take, winging his way eastward from Japan. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 8, 1924

Everywhere in the mines of Western Washington, and particularly in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, there is much stress placed on safety work. As a result the number of serious accidents is kept down to a minimum.

This scene shows the precautions taken to support the roof while the miner operates the “slugger” in undercutting the coal. As he prefers not to reveal his identity, we leave it to you to guess the name of this “Safety First” miner. (more…)

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