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Posts Tagged ‘Bellingham’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 10, 1924

Newcastle ‘Babettes’ win over long-tressed rivals

Hundreds of coal miners and their families cheer participants as Bellingham wins event

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Bellingham and Newcastle divided first honors in the largest first aid and mine rescue meeting ever staged in the state at Carbonado yesterday when twenty-five teams, representing six coal mining towns, competed in contests held under the auspices of the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Association.

About a thousand persons, most of them coal miners and members of their families from the competing camps, witnessed the contests and cheered the participants with all the enthusiasm of spectators at a big field and track meet. The meet is an annual affair, staged by the mine operators and coal mine workers.

Bellingham took first prize in the mine rescue contest, in which interest centered not only because an efficient mine rescue team is the pride of every coal camp and its main dependence in case of mine disaster, but also because such contests are spectacular to a degree. Newcastle was second and Carbonado third. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 21, 1920

Increases of from 19 cents to $1.40 a ton coming, says fuel dealer

Increases ranging from 19 cents to $1.94 in the cost of coal a ton in Seattle will ultimately be one result of the United States Railway Labor Board wage award of $600,000,000 to railway employees, said Harvey S. Jordan, commissioner of the Retail Fuel Dealers’ Association, today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 28, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

On the northwestern slope of Mt. Baker, a few miles south of the boundary line between United States and Canada, is a deposit of coal measures containing lenses of very good quality of anthracite coal. In addition to the anthracite, outcrops of high grade bituminous coals have also been found.

The area in which these coal outcrops occur is mountainous and forms the high foothills of the western slope of the Cascade Mountains. The district is drained by the Nooksack River and its tributaries, Glacier and Cornell creeks.

To date no one can state definitely the extent of these coal deposits, but they evidently cover eight or ten square miles and probably more. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 3, 1922

Burnett Mine Rescue Team: Reading left to right: standing, George Kothe, A.L. McBlain, captain; C.W. Eidemuller; kneeling, Theodore Gustafson, Robert Wallace, R.L. McKinnis.

Burnett Mine Rescue Team: Reading left to right: standing, George Kothe, A.L. McBlain, captain; C.W. Eidemuller; kneeling, Theodore Gustafson, Robert Wallace, R.L. McKinnis.

The big Mine Rescue and First Aid meet is to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, Sept. 4.

This was decided by representatives of the Federal Bureau of Mines, the State Mining Department, and operators of King and Pierce counties at a meeting held by them at Black Diamond on Thursday, July 27. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 26, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Washington has plenty of the black mineral but its production has fallen tremendously

A truck loaded coal at the tipple of the Cougar Mountain mine for hauling to the Newcastle storage bunkers. – Photos by Parker McAllister.

A truck loaded coal at the tipple of the Cougar Mountain mine for hauling to the Newcastle storage bunkers. –Photos by Parker McAllister.

Washington’s coal industry is in a state of suspended animation. Once a heavy contributor to the prosperity of the region, it is represented now by only a few scattered operations. Diesel oil, electricity and, lately, natural gas have cut off the markets.

Coal production in the state declined from a peak in 1918 of 4,128,424 tons to an average of 600,000 tons annually.

In King County, which owes its early economic development largely to its bituminous-coal beds, only five mines are active.

Refuse dumps and sealed tunnels south and east of Lake Washington, south of Lake Sammamish and in the Cedar and upper Green River Valleys attest the once-wide extent of mining within a few miles of Seattle. (more…)

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