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Posts Tagged ‘bituminous coal’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 20, 1989

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Voices out of Black Diamond’s past tell the story of mine disasters, whispered scandals, sports shenanigans and colorful characters in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories.

Tales spun by the Welsh, Italian, Slavic and other settlers of the town—dependent on the mines for its lifeblood—weave a lively pattern of poignant portraits of hard life and high times in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1935

New coal vein opened by operator at Bayne

Operation of development is under way

Almost inexhaustible supply is disclosed by examinations

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

According to local mine experts, one of most valuable coal veins ever to be opened up in this region has been recently uncovered at Bayne by Jim Bolde, operator of the Carbon Fuel Company mines. Although that property has been producing high grades of coal for many years, the vein now being worked is entirely new and its outcropping was located in a dense forest almost a mile from the other workings. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 2006

By Frank Hammock

Franklin coal carNestled in silence along a hillside 3 miles southeast of Black Diamond, Washington the forgotten remnants of a historical town once stood that was busy and teamed with life. Few people know of its existence and even fewer know of its significance to Washington’s history. In fact, driving by the area one would never even know that a town of over 1,000 people once existed there because its current location is severely obscured by trees and underbrush, and there are no signs that betray its hidden presence. Only a well worn trail will lead the curious from the main paved road through a gate and into the wilderness beyond.

Stories fit for a campfire abound of men and families that lived in this small locale at the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. How much do we know about the forgotten town of Franklin? Where did it go and why? What was unique about it?

On the afternoon of January 14, 2006, I had the joyful opportunity to learn more when I attended a tour of the old town site led by Mr. Don Mason of the Black Diamond Historical Society. (more…)

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