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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Coal Co.’

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Post-Intelligencer, June 26, 1884

The idea of subsidizing the Columbia & Puget Sound Company to enable it to complete its road up Cedar River was a good one, but not so good as another that has since been put forth. The new idea is to loan the company the needed money, and it was proposed by Mr. Howard, the company’s representative. The terms upon which the money is to be loaned will strike the reader as most fair, and will be found reported in full in the following. (more…)

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By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

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Originally published in the King County Journal, June 2001

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Black Diamond is a small town located 35 miles southeast of Seattle, east of Auburn, and south of Maple Valley. It was established more than 100 years ago when a wealth of coal was discovered. The town’s name came from the Black Diamond Coal Company of California, which began mining in the area in the 1880s. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 23, 1900

Entombed in a deadly pocket

T.A. Davis, one of the oldest coal miners on the coast, caught in the rush of burning fluid and held to his death—comrades work to find his body—two workmen were badly injured

One man is entombed in a pocket of terrible coal gas and doubtless dead and two are seriously burned as a result of an explosion in one of the Black Diamond mines at 10 o’clock Wednesday morning.

The man believed to be dead is T.A. Davis, one of the oldest employees of the company.

The injured are Maurice Roccia and a miner named Kline. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 23, 1900

Morris Roscia, a coal miner formerly employed by the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company, has commenced an action against the company in the federal court to recover heavy damages for alleged personal injuries.

The plaintiff alleges that on February 21, 1900, he was working for the defendant at a point several hundred feet under the surface, and that there was danger from coal gas. He claims that this fact was well known to the defendant, but that it permitted an open lamp to be brought into the workings, which caused an explosion.

He states that he was blown with great force against a wall of the workings, had both ears blown off, and was seriously injured about the head, so that he will be a cripple for life, and unable to work at his trade. He asks damages in the sum of $15,249.20.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 22, 1900

John Leski, a Hungarian, who was, last week, detected in an attempt to dispose of a large amount of copper and brass originally composing a part of a steam exhaust pipe, was given a preliminary hearing before Judge Cann yesterday and bound over for trial to the superior court under $1,000 bonds.

Superintendent Morgan Morgans yesterday positively identified the metal as having been stolen from a warehouse of the Black Diamond Coal Company at Black Diamond several months ago. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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