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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Historical Society’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 29, 2015

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the 1926–27 Black Diamond soccer team comes courtesy of Jerry and Lynda English.

This photo of the 1926–27 Black Diamond soccer team comes courtesy of Jerry and Lynda English.

The Black Diamond Miners, as they were called, were in the first division of Northwest Soccer League playing teams such as Todd Shipbuilders and others sponsored by local companies and communities. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 1988

By Heather Larson

Black Diamond’s “Person of the Year,” honored at the town’s annual Labor Day weekend celebration, was Lois Zumek, shown above. — Voice photo by Terry McLellan.

Black Diamond’s “Person of the Year,” honored at the town’s annual Labor Day weekend celebration, was Lois Zumek, shown above. — Voice photo by Terry McLellan.

Black Diamond’s annual September celebration commemorates days past when the coal mining industry reigned. The culmination of the festivities is on Labor Day with a parade, pancake breakfast, games, and a greased pole climb.

The Laurel Assembly No. 144 of Rainbow Girls in conjunction with the Black Diamond Masons served breakfast to 142 adults and 10 children on Monday. The meal consisted of ham, pancakes, scrambled eggs, juice, and coffee.

Honored in the nearly one-hour parade down the Maple Valley Highway were Lois Zumek, person of the year; Jim and Connie Leider; King and Queen; and Paul and Gertie Botts, prince and princess. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 30, 1990

Coal car collision: A trailer broke free from an asphalt truck traveling north on Highway 169 on Sunday around 5 p.m. and smashed into Black Diamond’s historic coal car marker. According to Black Diamond Police, the trailer broke its safety chain, crossed between cars on the highway, smashed into the coal car, and came to rest against a telephone pole. Monday, the Black Diamond Historical Society was seeking bids for the replacement of the coal car, which was dedicated in 1962. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Coal car collision: A trailer broke free from an asphalt truck traveling north on Highway 169 on Sunday around 5 p.m. and smashed into Black Diamond’s historic coal car marker. According to Black Diamond Police, the trailer broke its safety chain, crossed between cars on the highway, smashed into the coal car, and came to rest against a telephone pole. Monday, the Black Diamond Historical Society was seeking bids for the replacement of the coal car, which was dedicated in 1962. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Black Diamond Historical Society members spent Thursday at the museum straightening the iron from the historic Third Avenue coal car that was smashed by a runaway trailer May 20.

“It’s pretty badly beat up,” historical society member Bob Eaton said. “All the iron was bent. We can’t buy a replacement.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Miss Kimberly Capponi, affectionately known as “Kim,” will be installed as Worthy Advisor, Laurel Assembly of the International Order of Rainbow Girls on Saturday, May 20, at the Masonic Temple in Black Diamond. She will serve for a four-month term. (more…)

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