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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Historical Society’

Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 23, 1986

A recent photo of one of the trails at Franklin.

A recent photo of one of the trails at Franklin.

Employees of Seattle-based Recreational Equipment Inc., recently chose the old Franklin area of Black Diamond as the site of their annual service project for 1986.

Mail order division employees, 34 strong, arrived in Black Diamond Saturday, April 5 with equipment necessary to work on trails in what was the bustling coal mining community of Franklin at the turn of the century.

Assisting Recreational Equipment, or REI, workers were Carl Steiert, Don Mason, Robert Eaton, and Ted Barner, all members of the Black Diamond Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 17, 2015

By Bill Kombol

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

Sometime after the closing of the Cannon Mine in 1922, its bridge over the Green River was repurposed to carry piped water to the town of Black Diamond’s water supply facilities.

This photo dates to the late 1940s or early 1950s and shows the Cannon mine bridge supporting the water pipeline in the lower right.

This view is looking east across the Green River to below where the city’s springs pour forth subsurface water.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply as can be seen in the aftermath in this photo. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1995

By Stephen Clutter
Seattle Times south bureau

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

BLACK DIAMOND — It’s a sunny morning in this rural town in southeast King County. An earthmover rumbles deliberately along a hill where coal mines once flourished. Carpenters are busy. New houses are being built. People are moving in.

On a bench at the Black Diamond Historical Museum sits Carl Steiert, dressed in his overalls and well-oiled work boots, watching it all.

Steiert, 84, is an essential element of a town changing as rapidly as Black Diamond. He’s not a politician or college-educated scholar. He’s a walking, talking archive, and there’s a move afoot to preserve him. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 8, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The single-lane bridge over the Green River Gorge is a vista to behold as you cross 150 feet above the river; and even more remarkable when looking up. The bridge was built in 1915 to replace earlier wooden crossings that served the nearby coal mining town of Franklin founded in 1885 by the Oregon Improvement Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 25, 2014

By Bill Kombol

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

The high bridge spanning the Green River Gorge, a famed and scenic site located between Cumberland and Black Diamond, was built in 1915. The bridge, now a single-lane design, is still in service nearly 100 years later. It was built to connect the Green River Gorge Road west of the river with the Enumclaw-Franklin Road to the east. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 4, 1984

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Railroad depots, important to transportation and commerce in many communities throughout King County for many years, have been given a new role in recent times.

Relegated to obscurity as deteriorating warehouses or unused buildings beside seldom-used railroad tracks, some of them are now gateways into the past.

Depots at Snoqualmie and Black Diamond already have been turned into museums and monuments to community history. Those in Issaquah and Lester could be given the same roles if individuals concerned about preserving them have their way. (more…)

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