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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Museum’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 10, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Pride in their town and a love for its rich 105-year history are expected to bring hundreds “Coming Back Home” to Black Diamond Sunday, June 14.

Stressing the “Coming Back Home” theme, sponsors have organized a Black Diamond Day that will appeal to people of all ages, a spokesman for the annual event said. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, April 1992

Dan Palmer and his pup, Pal, will entertain April 14, 7:30 p.m. at the Maple Valley Community Center. (Photo by B. Nilson)

Dan Palmer and his pup, Pal, will entertain April 14, 7:30 p.m. at the Maple Valley Community Center. (Photo by B. Nilson)

The historical society is sponsoring an evening performance by a Black Diamond folk singer and musician, Dan Palmer, April 14, 7:30 p.m. at the Maple Valley Community Center.

This will be in lieu of the regular afternoon meeting the third Monday of April. “If it is successful, we’ll schedule more evening meetings as requested by some of our members,” said Barbara Nilson, president.

Palmer composes songs about the Northwest including “Washington Territory,” “Mount St. Helens,” and “Wagon Train” that he completed just days before he joined the wagon train that crossed the state for the Centennial in 1989.

His song “Black Diamond Mines” was written for that town’s 100th birthday celebration in 1986. The ballad is about Dooda Vernarelli, his neighbor, who told him about the significance of the whistles blowing in the mines.

There will also be sing-a-longs to popular old-time tunes, he said.

Admission to pay for the entertainment is $3 for the general public; $2 for historical society members; and $1 for children under 12.

Coffee and cookies will be provided by the historical society.

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Originally published in The News Tribune, April 23, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

For 47 years, Black Diamond’s Labor Day celebration has displayed the essence of a close-knit small town.

There were three-legged races. A greased-pole climb. A shoe-kicking contest. And a parade everyone in the community could join—and did.

But this year, organizers are afraid there might be no three-day Labor Day celebration. Only three people came to the last organizational meeting, said Lorianne Taff, who was there.

Taff moved to Black Diamond less than two years ago.

“I fell in love with the town and the charm of the town, and I want to see it preserved,” Taff said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Ken Jensen

A business sign means more than just hanging out the proverbial “shingle.” There’s always a story.

Case in point. On the cover we find the KoernersJohn and Walt—posing in front of their drug store in 1925. One of the signs on the building is for United Cigar Stores Co.

Turns out that cigar franchise was a real boon for the Koerners—and for Black Diamond, too—as John Koerner reported in the September 1922 Pacific Coast Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published by the Valley Daily News, September 2, 1988

By Bruce Rommel
Staff reporter

Residents of Black Diamond will gather again Sunday and Monday to honor the American worker, and remember the days when coal was king.

There will be flags and a parade, a greased-pole climb, soap box racers, and pie-eating contests.

Area residents are invited to join the festivities and learn something about the century-old community’s coal-mining heydays.

A pancake breakfast and parade are planned for Monday morning, followed by brief Labor Day ceremonies and an afternoon of family oriented games and other events.

The annual Labor Day observance in Black Diamond carries on a tradition begun at the turn of the century in the one-time company town. Labor Day once meant a show of solidarity of union coal miners who clashed with company goons in bitter and sometimes violent strikes during the 1920s. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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