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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Store’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1988

By Ann Steiert

Black Diamond stores, circa 1885. Photo courtesy of Ruth Stowe.

Black Diamond stores, circa 1885. Photo courtesy of Ruth Stowe.

As we have been exploring the history of Railroad Ave. and the businesses that have been on it over the years, we have been told many times that the first store was a log building located where the present saloon [the empty former book store] now stands.

We were told that the when the need for a larger building was felt, the then owners simply built their new building up around the first store and used the old building for firewood as they needed it. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

The Pacific Coast Company safe, donated by Joe and Eileen Zumek, is on display in the lower level of the museum. The safe was used in the General Merchandise store on Railroad Ave. for many years. This safe was in the front of the store where every one could see it, including the police as they drove by, a common practice in the day.

The Pacific Coast Company safe, donated by Joe and Eileen Zumek, is on display in the lower level of the museum. The safe was used in the General Merchandise store on Railroad Ave. for many years. This safe was in the front of the store where every one could see it, including the police as they drove by, a common practice in the day.

Gaining entrance to the building through the garage in the rear, and thence through a window into the basement, thieves sometime last Thursday night or early Friday morning broke into the Company store at Black Diamond and successfully escaped with money and merchandise estimated to be worth $2,000. No clue, aside from well-defined fingerprints, was left by which the identity of the culprits might be established.

The burglars apparently were familiar with the premises and they worked with the precision of experts. They skillfully picked the lock on the safe in the office by knocking the combination off and after dumping the contents on the floor, helped themselves to $1,100 which had been deposited in the safe. They also carried off a quantity of jewelry which had been locked up with the money.

Merchandise in the store, consisting of shoes and various articles of clothing, was also carried off, the total value of which was approximately $900. Banana peels strewn about the floor indicated that the yeggs had a failing for the fruit made famous in song and that they were in no hurry. The total loss is estimated at approximately $2,000, partially covered by insurance.

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The west side of Black Diamond's main street (Railroad Ave.), looking south from the depot, circa 1910.

The west side of Black Diamond’s main street (Railroad Ave.), looking south from the depot, circa 1910.

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, May 1992

By Ann Steiert

Most local members of the Black Diamond Historical Society are delighted to hear that the old saloon building on Railroad Ave. is being made to come alive again. Jared Fors, who owns Alphy’s Pizza Houses, has purchased the building and is going to make it into an eatery. Plans are for a family style restaurant which will serve family type meals at a reasonable price. [Ed. This article was first printed in May 1992; today the building houses Baker Street Books.]

Much history has been reenacted in the space which the saloon occupies. The first building on the site was in 1885. It was a small log building. It served as a store for the settlers. As the population grew, more space was needed for their supplies. It was decided to build another building. The building method was a little unusual. Instead of demolishing the little cabin they built the new building up around it. They used the old cabin for firewood as they needed it. (more…)

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