Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 12, 1986

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

The Black Diamond city council Thursday unanimously granted a cabaret license to one tavern in the city, and in a split vote denied a license to another tavern.

The action came at the regular council meeting at city hall which was preceded by a public hearing on the licensing.

The council gave Jay Lewis of Black Diamond, who owns the Boots Tavern, a license to operate based on a police department report on the tavern located at 31119 3rd Street.

Councilmen Ben Gingrich and Rich Palmer voted against a license requested by the Black Diamond Saloon, however, located at 32707 Railroad Avenue. The vote was 3-2. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 10, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Pride in their town and a love for its rich 105-year history are expected to bring hundreds “Coming Back Home” to Black Diamond Sunday, June 14.

Stressing the “Coming Back Home” theme, sponsors have organized a Black Diamond Day that will appeal to people of all ages, a spokesman for the annual event said. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Puget Sound Electric Journal, Month unknown, 1919

By L.R. Grant

Coal Creek Mine bunkers, washers, etc.

What will eventually be one of our most important coal mine contracts was recently signed with the Pacific Coast Coal Company. It provides for all electrical power requirements of the briquetting and coal-crushing plants at Briquetville, near Renton, the mine at Coal Creek, near Newcastle, and the mine at Issaquah. The new contract will supersede the old contract at the briquet plant at once, and later on our existing contract at Issaquah. The rate is our regular rate for coal mines, Schedule C-15, Tariff No. 10.

The briquet plant and the mine at Issaquah have previously been described in the Journal. Coal Creek Mine is about five miles northeast of our Renton substation in a direct line, and about three miles east of Lake Washington, on a branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway. The town of Newcastle, where most of the miners live, is less than a mile northwest of the mine. This coal field was one of the first to be developed in the State of Washington and has been worked almost continuously since its first opening. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in Y Ddolen Mai/Mehefin, May/June 2007

By JoAnne Matsumura

The Black Diamond Historical Society has recently photographed the grave markers in the Black Diamond Cemetery, which is now over 125 years old. The oldest grave marker found is dated 1880 of one Rachel Williams. The cemetery is listed on the Washington Heritage Register, The National Register of Historic Places, and the City of Black Diamond Landmarks Register.

This photographic preservation project has captured a moment in time, to be preserved in perpetuity. The wood markers in those early days have long ago given way to the Pacific Northwest’s inclement weather, and those made of the early stone have deteriorated as well. Now, preserved in form that marker can be viewed for that moment in time, for we know that as time marches on so does the evolving deterioration. This project was partially funded by 4Culture, King County Lodging Tax.

The rich Welsh heritage of this once thriving company coal town is well represented by the names on the grave markers. There may be many more of Welsh decent at rest in the cemetery that we may never know, due to the lack of a marker, a name on a marker, or other reason. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »