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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 21, 1902

Burglars secure stamps to the value of $350 and small amount of cash

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

The Confectionery, circa 1940, was the site of the post office robbery in 1902. Today the building is the home to Black Diamond Pizza & Deli.

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, June 21.—The post office safe was blown open last night or early this morning and rifled. Three hundred and fifty dollars’ worth of stamps was taken.

Postmaster Charles McKinnon discovered the robbery when he arrived at the post office at 6:30 this morning. The office is located in the back part of a store and the store also sustained a loss of $10 in cash from the register, and a small amount of candy from the show case. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 21, 1923

Just to indicate where some of the coal goes which the mines at Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Burnett are constantly producing, the Bulletin this week presents a few scenes recently taken at the coal bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

In the upper corner to the left is shown long rows of sacked Black Diamond lump, waiting to be loaded on the naval vessel, Gold Star, the steamer to the right in the oval just below. This coal, 36,378 sacks, was shipped to various Government schools and radio stations in Alaska. The center view shows the ship’s sling loading coal into the hold. On the right, upper view, is another scene showing the sacked coal ready for shipment, while below is the steamer Birmingham City taking steam coal for her own boilers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 16, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the Maple Valley railway depot was taken in 1948 as viewed looking northbound along the Maple Valley highway (aka SR-169). The depot was also used as the dispatcher’s office.

It was the second railroad station in Maple Valley, replacing the first constructed in 1885, when the original rail line was built to access coal from the newly developed town of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 14, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much morel”

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much more!”

Over 350 roses, more than 150 tuberous begonias, plus much, much more can be seen in one gorgeous spot in Black Diamond! No, it’s not a park or a nursery; it’s the home of Darrel and Jewell McCloud on 1st Street, across from the elementary school.

When the McClouds moved here 34 years ago from Ellensburg, they brought with them six or eight roses. Over the years, their collection has “grown like Topsy,” often through the Valentine’s Day gifts of rose bushes for Jewell from their son Michael. They now have 56 new roses imported from Canada. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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