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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 17, 1924

Bidding against the competition of eastern firms, the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, recently won the contract for the building of the Test Weight Car shown in the above engraving.

The car weighs 80,000 pounds and is used jointly by the states of Washington and Oregon for the testing of railroad scales. The body of the car is composed of two castings running lengthwise, each of which weighs 17 ½ tons. The name plate just over the wheel in the center of the picture reads, “Built by Pacific Coast Eng’r. Co., Seattle, Wash.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 1977

By Harry Rossi & Norma Gumser

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Pacific Coast Co. Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Harry Rossi was ten years old or thereabouts [ca. 1930], and it was his chore after school to pick up the trimmings from the Pacific Coast Hotel. It made good food for the hogs.

He crossed the street at the depot with his load, down the wooden sidewalk going home. At the tavern, there were these three young men loafing out in front. One of them tripped Harry and his can of slop spilled all over the sidewalk. The young men roared with laughter and Harry scrambled to pick up the pieces.

He hurried home, down the broad sidewalk, past the garage, past the dry goods store, the meat market, and the bakery, and down the hill to home. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 5, 1989

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Ground was broken last week on the 1.3 acre site of the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s new branch at Four Corners. The site is on the south side of Kent-Kangley Road near the road’s intersection with Highway 169, across the highway from the bank’s existing branch. (more…)

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