Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 22, 1977

By Michael Prager
Times South Bureau

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

BLACK DIAMOND — Not far from the Black Diamond home of Jules Dal Santo, the Green River plunges down a magnificent gorge.

A mantelpiece to what Dal Santo and other locals call “God’s country,” the Green River Gorge is at once beautiful, rugged, and treacherous.

Each year, hundreds of people visit the gorge. They come for many reasons—fishing, canoeing, swimming, or just plain sightseeing.

But each year, the fun and beauty of the gorge are marred. Death and injury, too, are frequent visitors. Dal Santo should know.

It’s Dal Santo’s job as Black Diamond’s assistant fire chief to help rescue those whose fun turns against them.

“Broken legs, arms, necks, drownings, you name it,” the 61-year-old Dal Santo said, recalling 31 years of experience in search-and-rescue efforts on the river. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 20, 1924

When the man-trip starts down the slope at Newcastle Mine the men who are going on shift are always ready and waiting. This group was caught by the photographer just before they went on shift. In the front row can be seen H.G. Hagenbush, B.E. Van Alstine, A.C. Marsh, Frank Oriet, Walter Trover, Joe Daler, Otto Sproat, Victor Nelson, Robt. Joughin, and Geo. Brandon. In the back are A.L. Richards, Wm. Eddy, V.J. Ryan, Frank Hollands, and H.S. Syverson. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, June 21, 1989

Talk of the Town went to Black Diamond this week to ask people just what it is about the town that makes them want to live there. We did manage to find a few residents to query in the tiny metropolis.

Carl Steiert (curator of the Black Diamond Museum): Of course, some of us have lived here all our lives—we didn’t have anything to do with that.

I don’t like big cities. I started working for the BD Stage Co., then became a mechanic. It’s pretty out here and I like the small-town atmosphere. The older folks have passed away and now the younger people are coming in. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 19, 1974

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

A new community is springing to life in the Lake Morton area south of Black Diamond and enthusiasm among its backers is increasing by the day, all reports seem to indicate.

The 28-square-mile area encompassed by the community of Lake Heights extends roughly from Horseshoe Lake and the county’s Lake Sawyer Park on the north, Highway 18 on the south, 164th Place S.E. on the west, and the Green River on the east. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seatte Daily Times, June 15, 1900

The recent flooding of mine cut down output temporarily; this a banner coal year

“We are steadily at work pumping out our lower mine at Black Diamond,” said Manager N.H. Martin today, “which was flooded from a subterranean river some time ago. The work accomplished by the pumps we have on hand, though, is too slow for the company, and they have ordered several larger pumps from San Francisco, which will be here within a few days. These new pumps are of the latest pattern and are very costly. The work, however, they do is sufficient to guarantee the extra expense.”

Mr. Martin states that while the company’s output is considerably lessened at present by the flooding of the mines several weeks ago, it will soon be ahead of last year. At present they are only shipping about 600 tons daily. The usual average heretobefore has been about 1,100 tons. As soon as the mines are free from water, which, he thinks, will be in about six weeks, the daily output will run up to 1,200 tons. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »