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Posts Tagged ‘blacksmith’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 29, 1913

Joe Klansnik, of Black Diamond, and four-year-old child, receive serious injuries when car turns over

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Tuesday, July 29. – Three persons are in the hospital of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond and two may die as the result of injuries sustained in an automobile accident Sunday afternoon on the road between here and Auburn. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Tmes, June 9, 1968

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

Site preparation has begun on a 200-acre residential area on Cedar Grove Road in Maple Valley by the Four Lakes Development Co.

Four Lakes will have three quarters of a mile road frontage between the Hobart Road and the Maple Valley Highway.

Price range for the 150 lots of one to two and a half acres will be from $3,500 to $10,000, according to Walter Schaefer, president of the Four Lakes Co. Sales will begin in mid-June.

Four Lakes will offer a historic green-belt approach with a waterwheel and a blacksmith shop built shortly after the land was bought from the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1885 to be preserved.

Schaefer acquired the property this year from David Horrocks, grandson of James Horrocks, who pioneered the property. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 17, 1923

Toonerville trolley

Toonerville trolley

Guided by the accommodating hand of Supt. J.J. Jones, the editor of the Bulletin was conducted through Black Diamond Mine last Friday, May 11, and initiated into the mysteries of digging coal.

Down on the 12th Level, in Chute No. 1, on the South Side, J.D. Walton gave a demonstration of how a pick is used in digging, while up at the face in the gangway some of the boys were busy with a jack hammer, driving the gangway still further along the seam.

At the 11th Level Pete Kurth, cager, was found on the job, busy with the constant string of trips coming and going. Going on up to the 9th, the trip was made on the “Toonerville Trolley”—the auxiliary hoist between the 12th and 7th Levels used until the 12th Level is developed extensively enough to permit the switching of the main trip. (more…)

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Originally published in The Arts, newsletter of the King County Arts Commission, October 1977

The Franklin train is ready to head toward Black Diamond.

The Franklin train is ready to head toward Black Diamond.

A mining town that has vanished forever was the Southeast King County community of Franklin.

The town literally hung over the north side of the Green River, four hundred feet above the churning water. Space was always at a premium and the main part of town was strung out along the edge of the railroad track. There the mercantile store, blacksmith shop, coal bunker, and mine hoist vied for space with the eight-room company-owned houses, for rent at $10 a month. (more…)

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