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Posts Tagged ‘boarding houses’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 7, 1979

(This is the second in a series of feature articles written by students in Tahoma’s Beginning Journalism class. Steve Eichelberger, a senior, lives in Hobart where he became acquainted with Dorothy Iverson. She remembers when her small community housed the largest lumber mill in the Northwest.)

By Steve Eichelberger

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

For many years, Dorothy Iverson was a homemaker.

“Women didn’t work in those days,” she said about her early life in Hobart. Mrs. Iverson was born in Seattle where she lived with her three older brothers and three younger sisters before moving to Hobart while in the seventh grade.

She remains there today where she still helps operate the Hobart store.

Mrs. Iverson attended school in what is now the Hobart Grange and graduated from Tahoma, where she had been editor of the high school newspaper and class valedictorian.

She attended Wilson Business College in Seattle and after graduation was a secretary in Seattle for four years.

She married the late Iver Iverson in 1933 and they set up housekeeping in Hobart. Iver was employed at his father’s grocery store, the “Wood and Iverson Grocery Store,” where he continued to work until it burned in 1939. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 21, 1902

Burglars secure stamps to the value of $350 and small amount of cash

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

The Confectionery, circa 1940, was the site of the post office robbery in 1902. Today the building is the home to Black Diamond Pizza & Deli.

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, June 21.—The post office safe was blown open last night or early this morning and rifled. Three hundred and fifty dollars’ worth of stamps was taken.

Postmaster Charles McKinnon discovered the robbery when he arrived at the post office at 6:30 this morning. The office is located in the back part of a store and the store also sustained a loss of $10 in cash from the register, and a small amount of candy from the show case. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, June 13, 1913

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

Fire broke out in the Black Diamond Hotel last Friday morning at about 2 o’clock, said to be caused by a man’s carelessness in smoking in one of the rooms. The building and contents were entirely destroyed, and the flames spread to Pete Fredericksen’s meat market adjoining, and a nearby residence, both being consumed.

A small safe containing considerable money, a cash register, and some books were saved from the market. Some meat was also carried out, but much of it was stolen after being placed beyond the reach of the flames. The insurance on all the property was small and the loss consequently was considerable.

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