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Posts Tagged ‘boarding houses’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 21, 1902

Burglars secure stamps to the value of $350 and small amount of cash

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

The Confectionery, circa 1940, was the site of the post office robbery in 1902. Today the building is the home to Black Diamond Pizza & Deli.

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, June 21.—The post office safe was blown open last night or early this morning and rifled. Three hundred and fifty dollars’ worth of stamps was taken.

Postmaster Charles McKinnon discovered the robbery when he arrived at the post office at 6:30 this morning. The office is located in the back part of a store and the store also sustained a loss of $10 in cash from the register, and a small amount of candy from the show case. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, June 13, 1913

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

Fire broke out in the Black Diamond Hotel last Friday morning at about 2 o’clock, said to be caused by a man’s carelessness in smoking in one of the rooms. The building and contents were entirely destroyed, and the flames spread to Pete Fredericksen’s meat market adjoining, and a nearby residence, both being consumed.

A small safe containing considerable money, a cash register, and some books were saved from the market. Some meat was also carried out, but much of it was stolen after being placed beyond the reach of the flames. The insurance on all the property was small and the loss consequently was considerable.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 2010

By Bill Kombol

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

This photo shows the 17-room boarding house belonging to Ben and LuLu (McCracken) Miller, which operated near a coal-mining town called Naco, the home of the Navy mine operations on the Naval coal seams.

Originally known as Sunset, the name was changed to Navy in 1908, and in 1916 the Northern Pacific railroad coined the term Naco for the railway stop. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Pacosco, as it is now called, was formerly Franklin. This district was first opened on the banks of Green River on the McKay Coal Seam about 1885. The railroad was extended from Black Diamond in order to develop this coal area.

Originally, Franklin Mine was opened by a drift driven on the McKay Coal at bunker level above the old railroad grade. Later a water level gangway was driven from the edge of Green River and the coal hoisted up an incline on the surface and dumped over the same tipple as that from the upper level. Later a slope was sunk on another bed which underlies the McKay and all of the coal below the original bunker level was hauled through this opening.

Numerous slopes were sunk at Franklin and also one shaft was developed. Most of the coal was mined from the McKay Bed but some was also mined from two underlying beds, the Number Twelve and the Number Ten. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, March 14, 1990

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Around the turn of the century, Paul Kos left his wife and family behind in Yugoslavia (then Austria-Hungary) to find a better life in America. He came to the coal mines in Ravensdale, south of Issaquah.

The first words Kos learned in English were “hurry up!” Working 10 hour-days for $2.50 a day it took him five years to save up enough to bring Rose and the two oldest children over.

In 1912, the family moved to Issaquah to take advantage of the town’s coal boom. Single miners lived in rooming houses or in the tent city along the creek, but the Kos family bought the “horseshoe” house at First Avenue NE and Bush Street. (more…)

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