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Posts Tagged ‘bootlegging’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1925

One of the largest and most modern moonshine plants seized this year was raided by federal prohibition agents under Director Roy C. Lyle at 6 o’clock this morning on a ranch a short distance above Enumclaw near the Green River Gorge.

More than 135 gallons of newly run moonshine was seized and four men, Tony Fontello, D. Fontello, father and son; John Pinola and Paul Rocco were arrested.

An elaborate plant had been installed in a barn, according to the federal agents, equipped with running water, pumped by a gasoline engine. Two 100-gallon stills, hooked up in tandem, a new system, the agents say, so that the capacity of the stills was doubled, with a triple set of coolers and coils. Eleven 500-gallon mash tubs, one with a capacity of 1,000 gallons and another with a capacity of 1,500 gallons, were in use.

The plant had been in operation less than six weeks, the agents say.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 28, 2004

By Wally DuChateau

Make no mistake about it, friends, as Seattle’s urban sprawl moves onto our Plateau, it brings county and state regulations that sound the death knell for many of our most cherished and picturesque traditions. Long-standing customs and businesses suddenly become illegal. And the newly-enforced laws frequently don’t make a lot of sense.

Take, for example, the Ravensdale Market. This old, down-home institution has been around for a century. Only God knows what the original structure was used for, but the Markus family bought the building in 1908, used horses and skids to drag it across the street to its present location, and turned it into a grocery store. It has been a community center for Ravensdale and the surrounding region ever since. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 9, 1983

By Val Varney
Times South bureau

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Now that there is a place to store all the memorabilia of Black Diamond, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society are busy working on an addition to the former railroad depot, applying for grants and taping the memoirs of the old timers.

“When it’s completed,” said Ann Steiert, society secretary-treasurer, “we hope it can benefit the whole community.”

The museum project began as an offshoot America’s Bicentennial celebration in 1976. Some residents felt it was important to preserve local history. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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