Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘bootlegging’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 9, 1983

By Val Varney
Times South bureau

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Now that there is a place to store all the memorabilia of Black Diamond, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society are busy working on an addition to the former railroad depot, applying for grants and taping the memoirs of the old timers.

“When it’s completed,” said Ann Steiert, society secretary-treasurer, “we hope it can benefit the whole community.”

The museum project began as an offshoot America’s Bicentennial celebration in 1976. Some residents felt it was important to preserve local history. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 16 and 23, 1977

By Jalo Lahtinen

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the east fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

When you tell someone you’re from Hobart, “Where is Hobart?” they ask.

It is at the headwaters of Issaquah Creek, the two forks known to us old stump jumpers by the following names—north fork as Holder’s Creek, east fork as Carry’s Creek.

It’s part of Cedar River Valley, nestled in the foothills of the Cascades with an eastern view of the Stampede Pass area and Mount Rainier to the south.

Once a sawmill town and farming area with self-sustaining farms and part-time stump farmers it was a paradise, a boy’s dream. Our mountains—Tiger, Taylor, and Sherwood were covered with the forest primeval, a cathedral of the Gods, an emerald jewel that God dropped in the right location, only a three-to-four mile area.

Near the summit of Sherwood is a beautiful spring two to three feet across, a trickle of the most beautiful blue water you could lay your eyes on running out of it—cold, refreshing, and thirst quenching.

Our streams were full of spawning salmon and land-locked sockeye in the fall, spawning by the hundreds. We called them red fish, cut-throat, and steelhead—no trick to catch a mess at any time. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 28, 1923

Giant booze plant found by raiders

Government agents destroy King County liquor plant with capacity of 150 gallons a day

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

After an ambush of many hours and a spectacular raid in which nearly a score of shots were fired, federal prohibition agents sent up in smoke yesterday, in a secluded valley about three miles from Black Diamond, a distillery, which, they believe, has been one of the largest sources of moonshine in the Northwest.

The distillery, complete from top to bottom, and boasting an oil burner, occupied an entire building—a former combination barn and hop kiln—and had, it is estimated, a capacity to produce from its several vats and its 800-gallon cooker, or still, about 150 gallons a day, which would bring its daily net earnings, considering the bootleggers’ quoted wholesale price, to approximately $900.

Nothing had been overlooked by the moonshiners in their apparent effort to manufacturer a good grade of liquor in great quantities and in varieties in the quickest possible time. There were vats for corn mash, for rye, for prune and for sugar mash, and a piping and valve system which made it possible for one man to operate the plant at top production. The value of the plant was estimated at about $10,000, including contents. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 20, 1989

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Voices out of Black Diamond’s past tell the story of mine disasters, whispered scandals, sports shenanigans and colorful characters in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories.

Tales spun by the Welsh, Italian, Slavic and other settlers of the town—dependent on the mines for its lifeblood—weave a lively pattern of poignant portraits of hard life and high times in Black Diamond. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1992

By Ann Steiert

booze roomIn the museum we have taken one small room and converted it into our “Booze Room.” In it we have a restored cider press, assorted bottles and glasses along with a whiskey still.

On the wall is a sign telling everyone that during National Prohibition Days bootlegging was our No. 2 industry. Many people get a charge out of that. We tell them a bit of how it was in those days when the country was dry.

At that time many people made and sold liquor. The county sheriff was the famous Matt Starwich. He was a many faceted person. He was a fearless officer and did his duty but he was not averse to taking some extra money if it were offered to him. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »