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Posts Tagged ‘boxing’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 3, 1924

Within the past week a German freighter, the Luise Hemsoth, and a British ocean carrier, the Ashworth, both took bunker coal at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 2, 1928

Two cities to hold joint celebration on grounds of Moore Park tomorrow; many features planned

Special to The Times.
CARBONADO, Saturday, Sept. 1. — Residents of Black Diamond and Carbonado will join in a Labor Day celebration here Monday, the principal event of the day to be a monster picnic. A program of sports for the children at 9 o’clock in the morning at N.D. Moore Park will start the celebration. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 8, 1923

October was a banner month in the production department, and demonstrated that the mines and the new forces are prepared to do their part at any time the coal market returns to normal.

All previous production per man per day records were exceeded at Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle, and at Burnett the total hoist for the month passed anything in the history of the mine.

These gratifying results were achieved because every man from the highest supervisor to the lowest laborer was on his toes and because everyone took an intense and a sincere interest in doing his particular part in showing what “we” can do. (more…)

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