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Posts Tagged ‘bridges’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 28, 1907

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Piledriver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Pile driver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

When one of the greatest common carriers of the country announced its determination to extend its line to the Pacific Coast, with Seattle as its terminal, excitement waxed for the customary nine days and then waned. During that time the land through which it was foreordained the road must pass advanced enormously in value, changed hands countless times, and finally became stably established in price on the market.

The advent of the great road was more or less a matter of futurity, the public was too busily occupied with the immediate present to concern itself with the future and the activities of the road were forgotten. But while the public has neglected to take cognizance of its operations, they have nevertheless been productive of results.

Armies of workmen are scattered along its roadbed for hundreds of miles, its construction work has now been extended to practically the outskirts of the city and it be only a matter of a few months before the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul again commands the attention of the public by sending its first train over the completed road to Seattle.

At Maple Valley, twenty-two miles from Seattle, the construction work has been going on rapidly. The railroad’s efforts are centered on the seven miles intervening between the intake of the Cedar River water system and Maple Valley. Beyond the intake the operations are confined almost entirely to clearing the right of way to North Bend, where the road is also engaged in construction work on a large scale. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1908

Fifteen minutes before a train loaded with 200 passengers would have been on it, the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad bridge across the Cedar River beyond Maple Valley, fell under the burden of a coal train and plunged six cars of coal instead of the cars of human beings into the river.

Had the coal train succeeded in getting across, there is no doubt that the passenger train would have plunged into the river, still swollen by recent floods and no one knows how many lives would have been lost. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1914

Road from Enumclaw to Black Diamond to be less than 5 percent at highest point

The high bridge across Green River Gorge, a famed scenic site located between Enumclaw and Black Diamond, was built in 1915, according to Swan Swanson, whose father drove the first car across it.

The new Enumclaw-Black Diamond highway, officially known as bond issue No. 9, will be on a maximum grade of a fraction less than 5 percent at its highest elevation, according to the location map filed with the Board of County Commissioners yesterday by Chief Deputy County Engineer C.P. Dexter. The grade on the old road is 20 percent.

This enormous drop in the in the uphill pull is one of the biggest improvements that the county will make under the road bond issue. The maximum grade of 4.9 prevails only on one-quarter of a mile between Enumclaw and Franklin. From Franklin to Black Diamond the new grade is 4.4 percent. The new highway is 7.2 miles in length and will cost $5,000 a mile. At Franklin the county will build a $30,000 steel bridge.

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Originally published in the Seattle Star, February 11, 1911

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad will rebuild the steel bridge across the Black River this spring in order to provide for the double track which will be laid between Seattle and Renton, to care for the heavy traffic caused by the operation of the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound over its tracks between Maple Valley and Seattle.

At least, such is the announcement made by the Railway & Marine News, off the press yesterday.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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