Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘briquets’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 2, 1925

Here may be nothing inspiring about the picture of a box car on the team track at Omak, Washington. But the significance of this scene lies in the fact that approximately seven thousand orchard heaters, designed to burn Diamond Briquets, were unloaded from that car last week.

These heaters are scattered throughout the orchards of the fertile Okanogan Valley, and in conjunction with the almost certain appearance of Jack Frost, will result in the consumption of hundreds of tons of briquets this spring where formerly briquets had never been seen. Similar shipments of orchard heaters have also recently been unloaded in the Yakima and Walla Walla fruit districts. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 26, 1925

Because of ill health Prof. M.M. Richardson, recently principal of the Newcastle Grade School, has resigned and is now taking a much needed rest. Succeeding him as principal is Mrs. R.R. Sterling, who for several years has taught the primary grades of the school.

Miss Winifred Butler, first at the left, teaches the third and fourth grades. Standing next to her is Mrs. Sterling, then Prof. Richardson and Mrs. Richardson, the latter being in charge of the fifth and sixth grades. The seventh and eighth grades are now being taught by Miss Grantham who will complete the retiring principal’s term. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »