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Posts Tagged ‘briquets’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 13, 1926

Scenes in the Garden of Eden could not have been more attractive than are the orchards of Wenatchee and Eastern Washington each spring when the apple trees are in full blossom. Against a background of jagged, snow-capped peaks, and nestled in the soft green of verdant clover and alfalfa, the exquisite beauty of the pale pink and white blossoms is beyond compare.

Until recently the orchardist was helpless against the blighting touch of late spring frosts, but thanks to the introduction of Diamond Briquets he is now able to protect his blossoming trees by heating his orchard. The picture shows a typical scene in the Wenatchee Valley. (Photo copyright by J.D. Wheeler.) (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 29, 1926

Expressing their genuine pleasure at the recent return home of N.D. Moore, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Black Diamond Band last Saturday evening serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Moore at their home, 618 Fullerton Street, Seattle. The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Moore, who knew nothing whatever about it until the music started. After a short concert on the lawn the boys were invited in and served with refreshments. Accompanying the band were Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, and Geo. Upton.

Those in the band included Bandmaster Frank Carroll, Earl Manchester, Ray Rosso, Wm. Tretheway, H. Parkinson, VanManchester, Ed Lockridge, Thos. Hughes, G. Lile, F. Heister, Jim Boyd, H. Saarella, B.M. McVicar, Ed. Crossman, Al Winckworth, Fred Carroll, B. McDonald, Theo. Rouse, and Tony Schultz. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 8, 1926

Orchardists throughout the fruit districts of Eastern Washington depend upon Diamond Briquets to protect their blossoming trees from damage by frost. Consequently, this spring the Pacific Coast Coal Company conducted an extensive advertising campaign in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Wenatchee districts, featuring Diamond Briquets as the ideal fuel for orchard heating.

This picture shows a window display arranged in Yakima, through the courtesy of the Yakima Daily Republic and the Yakima Morning Herald. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 18, 1926

Though the men who dig the coal seldom see it after it leaves the mine, they know that the product of their labor will go to warm the homes of many cities and towns. This picture shows one of the Ford delivery trucks of the Pacific Coast Coal Company from which is being delivered a load of Newcastle Lump. This truck is designed for quick and light deliveries and is able to haul its load anywhere that a car can be driven. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 11, 1926

Not only does the Black Diamond Band appeal to the ear with its melodies and martial airs, but the boys present a striking appearance in their natty new uniforms as well. This picture is published that those who heard the Black Diamond Band over the radio recently may know that they are an attractively garbed organization. Frank Carroll, director of the band, is a musician of years of experience and organizer of the famed Bellingham Elks’ Band. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1926

Members of the Washington State Press Association, in their fourteenth Annual Institute in Seattle, are to be the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company on Saturday, February 27. They will visit Newcastle, where they will make a trip into Primrose Tunnel, after which they will inspect the Briquet Plant on their return to Seattle. The Pacific Coast Coal Company welcomes this opportunity to greet the representatives of the press.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 11, 1926

Two monster Diamond Briquets, each weighing more than 200 pounds, proved a great drawing card in the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s booth at the Southwest Washington Manufacturers’ Exposition held in Tacoma last week.

A guessing contest was held, a ton of Diamond Briquets being the prize for the person guessing closest to the actual weight of the monster briquet shown on the mantlepiece. More than 3,000 guesses were recorded. J.F. Torrence is the manager of the Tacoma agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

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