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Posts Tagged ‘bunkers’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Puget Sound Electric Journal, Month unknown, 1919

By L.R. Grant

Coal Creek Mine bunkers, washers, etc.

What will eventually be one of our most important coal mine contracts was recently signed with the Pacific Coast Coal Company. It provides for all electrical power requirements of the briquetting and coal-crushing plants at Briquetville, near Renton, the mine at Coal Creek, near Newcastle, and the mine at Issaquah. The new contract will supersede the old contract at the briquet plant at once, and later on our existing contract at Issaquah. The rate is our regular rate for coal mines, Schedule C-15, Tariff No. 10.

The briquet plant and the mine at Issaquah have previously been described in the Journal. Coal Creek Mine is about five miles northeast of our Renton substation in a direct line, and about three miles east of Lake Washington, on a branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway. The town of Newcastle, where most of the miners live, is less than a mile northwest of the mine. This coal field was one of the first to be developed in the State of Washington and has been worked almost continuously since its first opening. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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