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Posts Tagged ‘bunkhouses’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 1, 1924

Cooley goes through mine accident unhurt

Imprisoned under a fall of rock and coal and only saved from being crushed by a single timber, Manley Cooley was rescued from Chute 29, 11th level, south, of Black Diamond Mine shortly before six o’clock last Tuesday evening.

Rescuers had worked without easing from 9:20 p.m. of Monday, when a “bump” occurred in Chutes 29 and 30 of the 11th level. Their efforts were in vain, however, for Robt. Doucette and O.C. Wise, both of who suffered instant death when the crash came.

Doucette’s body was recovered from Chute 30 about 11 o’clock Tuesday morning, but it was not until 4 a.m. of Wednesday that Wise was found in Chute 29. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 17, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brother Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brothers Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

There is nothing left of the mining town of Durham, once located in southeast King County near the town of Selleck, but it still exists in the minds of Valleyites who grew up there.

The Durham Colliery (English for coal mines and its buildings) was originally organized by Peter Kirk in 1886 to supply coal for the projected Kirkland steel mill. Durham was named for a town in Kirk’s native north England. Production was started in 1888 but coal was only mined until 1889. In 1910, the mines were started again and coal was produced throughout WWI. The mines and associated mining facilities, i.e. hotel, bunkers and company houses, were sold as one unit to the Morris brothers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1922

Les ForemanThis is L.W. Foreman, more generally known as “Les” Foreman, supervisor of cookhouses and bunkhouses, who entered the employ of The Pacific Coast Coal Company at the height of the emergency through which it has now virtually passed.

Before coming to the company Mr. Foreman had much experience in Treadwell, Alaska, in work much similar to that he is doing now, and since becoming supervisor of cookhouses and bunkhouses has had the opportunity to renew acquaintances in our camps with many of the men he met at Treadwell.

Mr. Foreman’s affable disposition and desire to please has won him many friends among the workmen, and has given him the hearty co-operation of his employees so that there is a satisfied atmosphere at all of the cookhouses and bunkhouses.

Due to the nature of the work, Mr. Foreman is a double-shift worker, having an opportunity to spend but few evenings at home, but he is always glad to put in all the time necessary on the work to keep the service at the proper standard.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 1, 1922

By E.F. De Grandpre, Dept. Mgr., Misc. Operations

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Pacific Coast Co. Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

A few days ago I had lunch in a so-called “good” restaurant in a fair-sized town on the way to one of our camps—considered a good place to eat and a cheap place.

I paid 40¢ for the regular lunch consisting of tasteless soup, pot roast (two small slices), potatoes (called mashed potatoes, but very lumpy), small side dish of boiled cabbage, small piece of sweet potato, white bread and small piece of butter, bread pudding with blackberry sauce, coffee.

The same day I had dinner at one of the company eating houses and for 50¢ was served: (more…)

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