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Posts Tagged ‘Bureau of Mines’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 9, 1923

If hard work and persistent effort is worth anything at all, the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid Team, under the leadership of Capt. B.F. Snook, is going to be a real contender for honors at the big inter-camp meet in Newcastle on August 18. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 2, 1923

When the photographer for the Bulletin last Thursday asked a group of Newcastle boys how many of them expected to attend the Elks’ big picnic in Woodland Park the next day, every one of the bunch answered with an emphatic, “I do.”

Because there are but thirteen boys in the picture shown above, it doesn’t necessarily indicate that was the size of the Newcastle delegation, which in fact totaled thirty-five, out of a possible thirty-four figured on by Welfare Director R.R. Sterling. The boys you don’t see in the picture were home hunting up the overalls with the biggest pockets and fewest holes, in which to stow away the promised peanuts.

Every boy in the picture is looking just like he did when President Harding stepped up to say “Howdy” at the picnic. At least that’s the way the photographer asked them to look. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 21, 1923

Just to indicate where some of the coal goes which the mines at Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Burnett are constantly producing, the Bulletin this week presents a few scenes recently taken at the coal bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

In the upper corner to the left is shown long rows of sacked Black Diamond lump, waiting to be loaded on the naval vessel, Gold Star, the steamer to the right in the oval just below. This coal, 36,378 sacks, was shipped to various Government schools and radio stations in Alaska. The center view shows the ship’s sling loading coal into the hold. On the right, upper view, is another scene showing the sacked coal ready for shipment, while below is the steamer Birmingham City taking steam coal for her own boilers. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 14, 1930

Company, state, and federal investigators say they are at loss to otherwise explain accident

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Death, flying through a section of the Carbonado coal mine on a spark, carefully locked away from human knowledge the real cause of the disaster which Saturday evening killed seventeen miners.

Company, state, federal, and miners’ representatives today had been unable to explain the tragedy. There were no survivors. Every man who might have given a clue was killed. Other workers were too far from the Douty seam where the blast occurred, to give an explanation. (more…)

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