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Posts Tagged ‘Burlington Northern’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 26, 1987

A marshy area adjacent to a small lake that lies southwest of Black Diamond may be one of the keys to the city’s future, if land developer Steve Graddon’s dream comes true.

Graddon presented his ambitious plan that involves a low-impact housing development and a nature preserve that would be the focus of “scientists from around the world,” to the Black Diamond city council Thursday, March 19.

At the center or the plan is Black Diamond Lake, or Chubb Lake as the old-timers call it. About 35 acres of the lake’s shore is made up of a forested sphagnum moss bog, one of only five known in the state. The bog is considered to be in pristine condition, thus making it more valuable to researchers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton Historical Society & Museum Quarterly, December 2012

By Kent Sullivan

Northern Pacific depot in Renton, circa 1912. (RHM# 41.0568)

I live in Kirkland, am a member of the Northern Pacific Railway Historical Association (NPRHA), and am an avid researcher of the Northern Pacific’s (NP) line along the east side of Lake Washington, known as the Lake Washington Belt Line and, for much of its history, the 11th Subdivision of the Tacoma Division.

I became especially interested in the Renton area after I became the latest custodian of the train order signal that hung on the Renton depot for almost 70 years at the corner of 5th Street and Burnett Avenue. I assumed the story of the Renton depot would be very simple and was surprised to find it was a bit complicated, and thought that readers of this newsletter might enjoy hearing what I learned. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 17, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Lester depot, built in 1886, has been designated as a county landmark by the King County Landmarks Commission, because of its significant association with early-day railroading which gave the Puget Sound area its first direct line across the Cascade Mountains to the East.

The depot—sold by Burlington Northern Railroad last week to a Woodinville developer for $1—joins a growing list of historically important structures which are protected from alterations that would change their character.

In the future, any contemplated changes affecting the depot must meet the approval of the Landmarks Commission. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in Voice of the Valley, May 3, 1972

By Laura Lorenz

Maple Valley will be able to develop its future environment about the way citizens expressed themselves at the pre-zoning meeting on April 13.

The King County Department of Planning returned to the Maple Valley Library on April 25 with the proposed zoning code sketched out on an area map. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 22, 1978

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

“Don’t buy your miner’s lamp yet!” Hugh McIntosh, public information manager for Seattle City Light, cautioned the Voice last week.

He referred to recently published reports regarding the possibility of reopening mining operations in the Green River coal fields, including the old mining towns of Black Diamond, Morganville, and Franklin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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