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Posts Tagged ‘Cannon Mine’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1914

Miner rescued after 7 days underground

By Roy A. M’Millan

Mike Bobcanik, rescued miner, and his family. They are, back row, left to right—Mike junior and Pauline; front row, left to right—Joe, Mike Bobcanik, the father holding little Tom; Mrs. Bobcanik and Annie. John is on his mother’s left.

Mike Bobcanik, rescued miner, and his family. They are, back row, left to right—Mike junior and Pauline; front row, left to right—Joe, Mike Bobcanik, the father holding little Tom; Mrs. Bobcanik and Annie. John is on his mother’s left.

FRANKLIN, Tuesday Feb. 24.—Seven nights and six hours were spent in a living tomb by Mike Bobcanik, a Franklin coal miner, who was rescued alive from the Cannon Mine at Franklin at 1:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

In a space ten feet long, four feet wide, and a foot and a half high, the prisoner stoically awaited his fate. He was without food during the time of his imprisonment but managed to obtain water. Today, this 137-pound bundle of nerves lies on a bed in his home at Franklin, under orders of a physician, and chafes at his continued enforced idleness. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 22, 1923

One week from today, Thanksgiving Day, there is promised a royal feed at each of the camps when the dinner gong sounds at the hotels.

In common with all Americans the custom of dining on the toothsome turkey will hold full sway. Judging from the array of savory viands listed on the Thanksgiving menu there is going to be plenty to go round with a second helping for everybody.

At Newcastle plans are already well under way by Chef Geo. W. Blake and his corps of able assistants, and when the big day arrives there is certain to be a crowd of hungry diners ready to start the chorus of “Please pass the turkey.”

Chef Emil Bernhard at Burnett believes not only in preparing a feast for the inner man but he invariably accompanies it with a feast of beauty for the eye, and his tables promise to be groaning with the weight of good things.

At Black Diamond the hotel diners are anxiously awaiting the spread which Chef J.P. Whelan has in store, which all agree will be complete from soup to nuts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1921

On another page of this issue of the Bulletin is a tabulation showing the daily average coal production of our mines last week.

The employees of the company who have been following the figures weekly—and of course each one interested in his work has—will see something significant in the totals presented.

In no week since the mines reopened has the company failed to show a steady gain in tonnage over the preceding week.

Sometimes, it is true, the increase was slight owing to the fact that difficulties were encountered for which neither the company nor its new employees were responsible; but whatever the figures they never failed to exceed those previously printed in the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1904

Pacific Coast Co. to put in third rail electric system soon

Change planned for Black Diamond, Gem, and Coal Creek properties

‘Bess’ the mule was employed at the Pacific Coast Co.'s Cannon mine in Franklin. In 1914 the Seattle Star exposed how mules at the mine were required to work 24 hours a day and never allowed outside. The Humane Society eventually ‘arrested’ Bess, releasing her for needed rest and forage outside the mine.

‘Bess’ the mule was employed at the Pacific Coast Co.’s Cannon mine in Franklin. In 1914 the Seattle Star exposed how mules at the mine were required to work 24 hours a day and never allowed outside. The Humane Society eventually ‘arrested’ Bess, releasing her for needed rest and forage.

The Pacific Coast Company will probably substitute a third rail electric system for mule trains in Black Diamond and Gem mines. The third rail system will also supplant the overhead trolley in the Coal Creek mines of the company.

The first change will be made at the Coal Creek mines, where a piece of road will be built by the company to demonstrate the value of the third rail system. It has been tried successfully in other mines and proved entirely satisfactory, but before the company takes up the plan as a substitute for other systems a thorough test will be made. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 11, 1915

Union workers of state regard as climax of depression suspension of operations in Franklin property

By C.J. Stratton

Long-continued depression in Washington’s coal mining industry and consequent precarious employment for the union miners of the state reached what the mine workers regard as a climax last week when the famous Franklin mine, one of the oldest and largest in King County, was shut down, possibly never to reopen.

The increasing use of California oil as fuel by steamships and power plants and the growing use of gas as a domestic fuel, combined with increasing operating expenses, due to the depth of the workings, are said to have been the principal causes of the shutdown. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Pacosco, as it is now called, was formerly Franklin. This district was first opened on the banks of Green River on the McKay Coal Seam about 1885. The railroad was extended from Black Diamond in order to develop this coal area.

Originally, Franklin Mine was opened by a drift driven on the McKay Coal at bunker level above the old railroad grade. Later a water level gangway was driven from the edge of Green River and the coal hoisted up an incline on the surface and dumped over the same tipple as that from the upper level. Later a slope was sunk on another bed which underlies the McKay and all of the coal below the original bunker level was hauled through this opening.

Numerous slopes were sunk at Franklin and also one shaft was developed. Most of the coal was mined from the McKay Bed but some was also mined from two underlying beds, the Number Twelve and the Number Ten. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 8, 1923

Smoker 08-03-1922 largeNewcastle box fighters walked off with everything, winning every decision, in the big smoker staged there last Saturday night. Before a crowd of wildly howling and enthusiastic fans the gladiators went to it in rough and ready fashion, and with the exception of the tame affair between Forbes and McQuillan, every bout was all that could be asked for in the way of action. (more…)

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Originally published in Voice of the Valley, September 16, 2008

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

By Bill Kombol

Coal miners Andrew Chernick and Mike Babcanik reported for work in the pre-dawn hours of February 16, 1914. Around 9 a.m., the water-soaked earth gave way and tons of liquefied mud and rock enveloped the two miners. Three days later the body of the 50-year-old Chernick was found and the 47-year-old Babcanik was presumed dead.

On that same day a story appeared in the Seattle Star exposing how mules at the Cannon mine were required to work 24 hours a day and never allowed outside. A photo of the emaciated Bess the mule appeared on the front page. Subsequent stories followed and the Humane Society eventually “arrested” the mule, releasing Bess for needed rest and forage outside the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1923

delivering-briquets-in-snow-2-22-1923If all obstacles to the future sale and delivery of coal are overcome in the same thorough and efficient manner in which the Sales Department, under Sales Manager Wylie Hemphill and his able corps of assistants, conquered the fury of the elements and filled every order for coal during the blizzard of last week, there need be little concern about the ability of the sales force to keep the mines working.

In the picture shown above you see one of the ingenuous methods employed to furnish fuel, when many coal concerns were tied up entirely, making no effort to undertake deliveries of orders. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 17, 2015

By Bill Kombol

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

Sometime after the closing of the Cannon Mine in 1922, its bridge over the Green River was repurposed to carry piped water to the town of Black Diamond’s water supply facilities.

This photo dates to the late 1940s or early 1950s and shows the Cannon mine bridge supporting the water pipeline in the lower right.

This view is looking east across the Green River to below where the city’s springs pour forth subsurface water.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply as can be seen in the aftermath in this photo. (more…)

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