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Posts Tagged ‘Cannon Mine’

Originally published in Voice of the Valley, September 16, 2008

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

By Bill Kombol

Coal miners Andrew Chernick and Mike Babcanik reported for work in the pre-dawn hours of February 16, 1914. Around 9 a.m., the water-soaked earth gave way and tons of liquefied mud and rock enveloped the two miners. Three days later the body of the 50-year-old Chernick was found and the 47-year-old Babcanik was presumed dead.

On that same day a story appeared in the Seattle Star exposing how mules at the Cannon mine were required to work 24 hours a day and never allowed outside. A photo of the emaciated Bess the mule appeared on the front page. Subsequent stories followed and the Humane Society eventually “arrested” the mule, releasing Bess for needed rest and forage outside the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1923

delivering-briquets-in-snow-2-22-1923If all obstacles to the future sale and delivery of coal are overcome in the same thorough and efficient manner in which the Sales Department, under Sales Manager Wylie Hemphill and his able corps of assistants, conquered the fury of the elements and filled every order for coal during the blizzard of last week, there need be little concern about the ability of the sales force to keep the mines working.

In the picture shown above you see one of the ingenuous methods employed to furnish fuel, when many coal concerns were tied up entirely, making no effort to undertake deliveries of orders. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 17, 2015

By Bill Kombol

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

Sometime after the closing of the Cannon Mine in 1922, its bridge over the Green River was repurposed to carry piped water to the town of Black Diamond’s water supply facilities.

This photo dates to the late 1940s or early 1950s and shows the Cannon mine bridge supporting the water pipeline in the lower right.

This view is looking east across the Green River to below where the city’s springs pour forth subsurface water.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply as can be seen in the aftermath in this photo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 3, 2015

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine in Franklin operated on the Gem and McKay coal seams, both lying on the east side of Green River. In 1914 the Cannon mine was connected by a 1,225-foot rock tunnel to the Franklin Gem and all the coal was processed in joint facilities.

While the coal processing facilities and the railroad were all on the west side of the river, the Cannon mine was on the east side. Hence, this bridge across Green River was constructed to bring coal out of the mine, cross the river, and then hoisted up an incline to coal bunkers near the Columbia & Puget Sound railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 2, 2010

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine was named in honor of Henry W. Cannon, a former president of Pacific Coast Company who served as chairman of the board of directors. Driving the gangway for the Cannon mine commenced on the Gem coal seam in 1910, about the same time that this new bunker with all modern equipment was first conceived.

Franklin was a coal mining town situated above the Green River Gorge where coal was first discovered by Victor Tull in July 1880 and coal shipments commenced in July 1883.

This image comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection, photo No. 41 and is also known as Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) No. 19182.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 31, 1921

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, and his famous truck, Mine Rescue truck, No. 3

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, and his famous truck, Mine Rescue truck, No. 3

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, began examining applicants for Mine Rescue and First aid teams at Issaquah last week.

The federal representative had intended to begin his work at Issaquah the week before, but was called out of the state on important business and the training had to be postponed.

Last Monday, however, Mr. Schoning and his famous rescue truck put in an appearance at the camp, and the examinations were at once started. Many sought certificates on both teams, and their general caliber seemed fully up to the high standard set recently at Newcastle, where thirty-four men won diplomas.

Mr. Schoning conducted his training and examinations with his usual care, and the names of the winners will be given in the Bulletin next week. (more…)

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