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Posts Tagged ‘Carbon Fuel Co.’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 10, 1924

Recently the Bulletin photographer succeeded in holding a group of men ready to board the man trip for a shift in Black Diamond Mine, by promising that the picture obtained would be published in the Bulletin. The gang of husky appearing miners and underground workmen seen above was the result. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 3, 1922

Burnett Mine Rescue Team: Reading left to right: standing, George Kothe, A.L. McBlain, captain; C.W. Eidemuller; kneeling, Theodore Gustafson, Robert Wallace, R.L. McKinnis.

Burnett Mine Rescue Team: Reading left to right: standing, George Kothe, A.L. McBlain, captain; C.W. Eidemuller; kneeling, Theodore Gustafson, Robert Wallace, R.L. McKinnis.

The big Mine Rescue and First Aid meet is to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, Sept. 4.

This was decided by representatives of the Federal Bureau of Mines, the State Mining Department, and operators of King and Pierce counties at a meeting held by them at Black Diamond on Thursday, July 27. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, December 17, 1967

By Marty Loken

Moss-roofed company houses are about all that remain of Bayne, a South King County coal-mining center that surged with activity 50 years ago. Hundreds of persons once lived in Bayne's small, look-alike dwellings, which are near collapse after years of neglect.

Moss-roofed company houses are about all that remain of Bayne, a South King County coal-mining center that surged with activity 50 years ago. Hundreds of persons once lived in Bayne’s small, look-alike dwellings, which are near collapse after years of neglect.

The stark skeleton of Bayne, a former coal-mining boom town, almost disappears during the spring and summer months, when alders, cottonwoods, and blackberry vines hide it amid their foliage.

Bayne, 15 miles east of Auburn, became a near ghost town 15 years ago when Jim Bolde, an almost legendary figure in this South King County mining area, reluctantly abandoned his Carbon Fuel Co. operation.

NOW, YEAR BY YEAR, Bayne is being swallowed by nature—inhabited only by Bolde’s widow, Rose, and a few “gyppo” loggers who rent the company town’s unpainted, three-­room houses.

The story of Bayne’s rise and fall is a reflection of Washington’s coal industry, which peaked out in 1918 and has slipped into economic obscurity. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1935

New coal vein opened by operator at Bayne

Operation of development is under way

Almost inexhaustible supply is disclosed by examinations

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

According to local mine experts, one of most valuable coal veins ever to be opened up in this region has been recently uncovered at Bayne by Jim Bolde, operator of the Carbon Fuel Company mines. Although that property has been producing high grades of coal for many years, the vein now being worked is entirely new and its outcropping was located in a dense forest almost a mile from the other workings. (more…)

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