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Posts Tagged ‘Carbonado’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 5, 1977

By Vince O’Keefe

Sam Abbey, 1924

Sam Abbey, 1924

The sepia-tinted photograph was 50 years old but several faces were recognized instantly—Armand Galvagno, Elmer Favro, Joe Hosko, Benny Marino, Johnny Torlai, Jerry Remolif. These were some of the Georgetown Merchants, Seattle Soccer League champions for that particular year.

There were other remembered “mugs” in the yellowed pictures and crumbling clippings—Louie Pennacchi, Jim McMillan, Benny McPhillips, Henry Tessandore, Les Lapsansky, Tom Werner, Howie Baldwin, Chink Woehrie, Tex Michel

That’s the way it was at the first official outing of the Pacific Northwest Soccer Oldtimers Association, held in Black Diamond.

For one day, at least, “The Diamond” was the Cooperstown of soccer. About 140 ex-booters, the youngest in his 50s and the oldest 91, were reunited in the little hill town southeast of Renton.

Main attraction was a collection of old photographs, trophies, and memorabilia, rounded up by Pep Peery, association secretary. By coincidence, a slimmer, black-haired Peery appeared in several of the snapshots.

Mining-community teams dominated the display: Black Diamond, McKay Coal, Ravensdale, Carbonado, Wilkeson. That’s where it all started, the diggers from Wales and England and Italy playing their favorite game in the early part of the century. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 23, 1926

Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls also win events at Burnett first-aid meet; new field telephone is tested

Miss Velma Hull, at field telephone.

Miss Velma Hull, at field telephone.

Newcastle mine workers carried off the honors in the annual mine rescue and first aid meet of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, staged at Burnett yesterday.

The Newcastle Boy Scouts and Newcastle Camp Fire Girls also won first places in the first aid contests. Approximately 1,200 persons, most of them mine workers and members of their families of Burnett and other coal camps, witnessed the contests.

The Newcastle combination first aid and mine rescue team made the high combination record, scoring 96.3, with the Burnett combination team second, score 96.2.

Winning the combination event entitles the Newcastle team to represent the Pacific Coast Coal Company in any other meet that may be held this year. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 19, 1923

Photo by James & Merryhew

Photo by James & Merryhew

No mention of Black Diamond would be complete without reference to Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Christensen, whose likenesses are shown above.

“Dad” Christensen, as he is familiarly known, is the Justice of the Peace in Black Diamond and is generally regarded as the father of the camp. Under his paternal care every operation of the camp’s varied activities, from the distribution of the Bulletin to the distribution of the mine’s output, is constantly watched and safeguarded. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 14, 1930

Company, state, and federal investigators say they are at loss to otherwise explain accident

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Death, flying through a section of the Carbonado coal mine on a spark, carefully locked away from human knowledge the real cause of the disaster which Saturday evening killed seventeen miners.

Company, state, federal, and miners’ representatives today had been unable to explain the tragedy. There were no survivors. Every man who might have given a clue was killed. Other workers were too far from the Douty seam where the blast occurred, to give an explanation. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 13, 1930

Miners on third level of Pacific Coast Coal Company’s workings victims of searing detonation

Twenty-two coal miners were reportedly killed in an explosion and rock slide in the Pacific Coast Company mine at Carbonado in central Pierce County, 34 miles southeast of Tacoma, last evening.

Eighteen bodies had been recovered at 11 o’clock last night, and rescue crews were working frantically to find the other entombed men.

The explosion was the worst tragedy in a coal mine in Washington State in many years. (more…)

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