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Posts Tagged ‘Carbonado’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 13, 1922

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

It has been announced that during the illness of R.J. Wulzen, general manager of the Carbon Hill Coal Company at Carbonado, George Watkin Evans will be in charge of the properties, representing Mr. Wulzen. While acting in this capacity he will make a complete examination of the operations.

Mr. Evans will be remembered as the author of the interesting articles on the Coal fields of Washington State recently printed by the Bulletin. He is one of the foremost consulting coal mining engineers of this part of the country.

Mr. Wulzen is ill of fever and intestinal trouble at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle. The latest report from Mrs. Wulzen, as the Bulletin went to press, was that he was resting easily and his friends need feel no uneasiness about him.

Those who know Mr. Wulzen were pleased to hear this, and hope it will not be long before he has fully recovered his health and is his own good self again.

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With the arrival of hot summer weather attention is again drawn to the fact that there are many residents of Black Diamond who have no effective means of disposing of garbage. At the last Mine Council meeting a move was instituted to improve the sanitary condition of the camp by asking everybody to provide themselves with garbage cans.

The company will provide a means for regularly disposing of all garbage deposited in cans, free of cost, and in order to make the entire camp fully sanitary it is absolutely necessary that every house be equipped with the proper type of garbage can. These may be obtained through the company store, and in case they are not installed promptly, steps will be taken to compel every resident to so equip his place.

At both Newcastle and Burnett every house is equipped with a garbage can and the menace of typhoid and contagion thereby greatly minimized. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 28, 1989

Fourteen sites in Pierce County and two sites in King County have been selected as locations for Washington centennial historical markers.

Puget Sound Power and Light will donate the markers to be placed in about 85 communities throughout its nine-county service area.

The 10-inch-square markers will replicate the official centennial dome shape and will be cast in solid brass by Anacortes Brass Works. They will be presented during ceremonies to be held during the summer months. (more…)

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