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Posts Tagged ‘Carbonado’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

Annual picnic source of stories of coal, men

By Gordon Koestler

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Deep within the spine of the Cascade Mountains, on either side of the summit, lie still-large coal reserves. Over the past 100 or so years, men like John Costanich, John Streepy, and George Savicke, supported by women like Mary Mihelich, have pulled the black diamonds out of mines near places like Wilkeson, Palmer, Roslyn, Carbonado, Cle Elum and, yes, Black Diamond.

Saturday, such men and women met to celebrate and remember that lifestyle at the annual Miners’ Picnic, conducted at a private park at the base of the Green River Gorge. Such luminaries as former U.S. Sen. Slade Gordon, now campaigning to return to the Senate, and Renton area state Rep. Mike Patrick thought enough of the Miners’ Picnic to attend the afternoon gathering, and King County Executive Tim Hill, 8th District Congressman Rod Chandler, and 31st District Rep. Ernie Crane were scheduled to put in appearances as well. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 30, 1923

When Dr. Edward T. Devine, member of the United States Coal Commission, visited the coal mining districts of the West last week, he spent one day on a tour of the mines in King and Pierce counties.

In the group above he is shown at Burnett with a number of Pacific Coast Coal Company employees, who, with Vice President N.D. Moore and Manager of Mines D.C. Botting, accompanied him on his visit to Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett, as well as to Carbonado and Wilkeson. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 27, 1915

A first aid and mine rescue contest, in which teams will be entered representing at least three of the large coal mining companies of Western Washington, is to be a feature of the Labor Day celebration at Black Diamond, next month.

Employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Northwestern Improvement Company, and the Carbon Hill Coal Company make up the three teams entered, and Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Carbonado will be the towns represented. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Washington mines boost prices to care for higher wages granted to miners recently

Following ratification last week by the mine workers’ state convention held in Seattle of the new working agreement between the Coal Operators’ Association and State District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America giving a general increase in wages, west side coal operators announced an upward revision of bunker prices for coal, which is now being passed on to consumers by Seattle retail fuel dealers.

Fifty cents a ton is the advance made on the grades of stove and range coal most used by Seattle householders, including the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Newcastle and Issaquah lump-nut, which are classed as lignites. The bunker price of these lignites is now $8.50. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 10, 1924

Newcastle ‘Babettes’ win over long-tressed rivals

Hundreds of coal miners and their families cheer participants as Bellingham wins event

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Bellingham and Newcastle divided first honors in the largest first aid and mine rescue meeting ever staged in the state at Carbonado yesterday when twenty-five teams, representing six coal mining towns, competed in contests held under the auspices of the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Association.

About a thousand persons, most of them coal miners and members of their families from the competing camps, witnessed the contests and cheered the participants with all the enthusiasm of spectators at a big field and track meet. The meet is an annual affair, staged by the mine operators and coal mine workers.

Bellingham took first prize in the mine rescue contest, in which interest centered not only because an efficient mine rescue team is the pride of every coal camp and its main dependence in case of mine disaster, but also because such contests are spectacular to a degree. Newcastle was second and Carbonado third. (more…)

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