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Posts Tagged ‘Carnation’

Originally published in The News Tribune, January 16, 1995

Assessed property value climbing in remote areas

By Kevin Ebi
The News Tribune

Randy Hopper was transferred to his firm’s Tukwila office from San Diego, but he and his family have chosen to live in an Enumclaw subdivision to get away from the problems of city living. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune)

Last year, Randy Hopper received more than a promotion.

He got a new quality of life.

The promotion took his family from the bright lights of San Diego to the rural life of Enumclaw.

Hopper, who didn’t want his job or employer revealed, is part of a trend being seen in Enumclaw and other rural cities in the county. It’s a trend of growth.

Even though the King County real estate boom ended in 1990, areas such as Black Diamond, Carnation, Duvall, Enumclaw, and North Bend continue to grow in value. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, December 7, 1941

Matt Starwich, King County jail superintendent and one of King County’s most colorful police officers, died at 11:22 o’clock last night in Swedish Hospital. He had been in the hospital since early last week, suffering from a complication of ailments.

Starwich, known affectionately for years as the “Little Giant,” had been in failing health since March 7, when he fell five feet on the roof of the County-City Building during Seattle’s test blackout.

The 62-year-old officer’s death ended a vigil that had been kept by his wife, son, and daughter at his bedside for more than 24 hours.

Starwich was the Americanized version of the family name. He was born Mateo Starcevis, son of a shoemaker, at Lich, near Flume (then in Austria), 62 years ago. When he was 12 years old he immigrated with a cousin to LaSalle County, Ill., and at an early age became a coal miner.

Starwich later moved to Marshfield, Or., and from there to Ravensdale in 1901, when there was little law in that mining community and less demand for it. Shootings, stabbings, and free-for-all fights were almost a daily occurrence there. The residents of the town used to brag about “riding” law-enforcement officers out on a rail. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 26, 1979

Roy Freeman, architect of the proposed new county (shown above) still insists that, indeed, its time is here. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Freeman says he has traveled 40,000 miles promoting the plan since 1972. The Create Cascade County group still has some left-over bumper stickers and $63 in the bank.

Cascade County, once formed, could make a go of it, Freeman said. The tax base in the proposed area has increased from $295 million in the early 1970s to more than $500 million. In 1974 he estimated $2.5 million was needed to run the new county, with tax revenue totaling $3.1 million.

“At present,” he argued, “we’re being run from Seattle.”

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

“In order to receive enabling legislation for Cedar County,” said David Fields, spokesman, “we had to name an incorporated city as the county seat so we selected Black Diamond.”

The Black Diamond City Council met Sept. 3 to discuss the proposal and voted unanimously that they would be glad to consider the proposition. “Of course,” said Mayor Howard Botts, “it all hinges on whether Cedar County becomes a reality.”

The official view, according to Mayor Botts, is that the city is neutral on the new county, neither opposing it nor promoting it.

“We’re certainly looking at it with interest,” he said. “It would mean a big change in Black Diamond.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 22, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Boundary lines for a proposed Cedar County were tentatively set last week, according to Dave Fields, spokesman for a group of six dissenters who are “fed up” with King County’s dominance over unincorporated areas.

The proposed county would stretch from the Snohomish County line and from the North Bend area as far west as the border of King County Fire District 43 and the east edge of Lake Youngs.

It would include the towns of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond, and Enumclaw. Also included would be the unincorporated areas of eastern King County, including Maple Valley and Covington without Lake Meridian. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, July 15, 1992

By Anthony K. Albert

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

MAPLE VALLEY — The Cedar County Coalition launched its effort to secede from King County Tuesday when it revealed its proposal for new county boundaries.

It would be the third attempt to secede from King County in two decades.

According to Dave Fields, one of the coalition’s six members, Cedar County would include all of eastern King County, as far west as the western border of King County Fire District 43, and the east edge of the Lake Youngs.

It would include the cities of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond and Enumclaw—its urban centers—and Maple Valley and Covington areas, minus Lake Meridian. Fields estimated Cedar County’s population would be about 65,000. (more…)

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