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Posts Tagged ‘Cascade Mountains’

Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

Annual picnic source of stories of coal, men

By Gordon Koestler

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Deep within the spine of the Cascade Mountains, on either side of the summit, lie still-large coal reserves. Over the past 100 or so years, men like John Costanich, John Streepy, and George Savicke, supported by women like Mary Mihelich, have pulled the black diamonds out of mines near places like Wilkeson, Palmer, Roslyn, Carbonado, Cle Elum and, yes, Black Diamond.

Saturday, such men and women met to celebrate and remember that lifestyle at the annual Miners’ Picnic, conducted at a private park at the base of the Green River Gorge. Such luminaries as former U.S. Sen. Slade Gordon, now campaigning to return to the Senate, and Renton area state Rep. Mike Patrick thought enough of the Miners’ Picnic to attend the afternoon gathering, and King County Executive Tim Hill, 8th District Congressman Rod Chandler, and 31st District Rep. Ernie Crane were scheduled to put in appearances as well. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 26, 1978

By Bill Ziegner

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

The largest privately-owned equestrian center in the Northwest is nearing completion at Cedar Downs, off Witte Road in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 17, 1902

Since Saturday morning Tracy has been hiding in the woods near Covington with two or three companions—He has been unable to travel owing to the wounds which were inflicted by Deputy Bunce—To prevent blood poisoning wounds were lanced by one of his pals

(Copyrighted, 1902, by C.B. Blethen,)

Harry TracyThe Times Special Service
BLACK DIAMOND, Thursday, July 17.—Tracy has again escaped. He has succeeded in eluding the Sheriff of King County and a posse of picked men who advanced on his hiding place three and a half miles from here last night, under the best program that has been formulated at any time during the chase.

The posse arrived at Tracy’s hiding place six or eight hours after he had left. He had taken a rowboat and had gone to the east side of Sawyer Lake, presumably about 2 o’clock this morning, accompanied by his two confederates. Sheriff Cudihee and the posse returned to Black Diamond at 2 o’clock this afternoon.

The chase from this point has been abandoned. (more…)

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