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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Falls’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1913

Delay in the opening of bids by the Board of Public Works for standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, insisted upon by The Times, today resulted in a bid of 51 cents a thousand above the bid of a week ago for fir timber, 60,000,000 feet of which is to be sold. The bid was submitted by the Northwestern Lumber Company, operating a large mill at Kerriston, on the Northern Pacific. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 8, 1977

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

Construction of the low level discharge control valve at the Cedar River Masonry Dam at Morse Lake, which had been planned for this summer, has been postponed for one year, according to a letter received recently from Gordon Vickery, superintendent of Seattle City Light.

The letter was sent to A.B. (Bud) Veleke, president of the Cedar River Home Owners’ Protective Association.

Vickery explains that the disastrously low water conditions affecting City Light’s power supply in 1977 has made the postponement necessary. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 19, 1976

bigfootEditor, the Voice:
When I was associated with the Cedar River Watershed, I covered almost every square foot of it by car, truck, plane, snowshoes, skis, and by foot.

Late one afternoon in early June, I was checking on the snow level in the vicinity of Goat Mountain when I walked into a colony of Sasquatch or the Bigfoot people as they are commonly called.

This was a colony of 31 people. They were very friendly with no spoken language, but they had developed a very refined sign language. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, December 23, 1918

Lumbering community desolated

Cottages of working men carried away by rush of pent up water at North Bend – Stream rises with amazing rapidity when old timbered structure gives way

“The arrow on the map shows where the big eruption took place at midnight, December 23, 1918, hurling a million and a half yards of rocks, earth, and gravel for miles around, opening up a creek, now called ‘Christmas Creek,’ which flowed on to Boxley Creek, causing it to rise and to add flood damage to the inhabitants of Edgewick. The town was completely destroyed. The map gives a graphic picture of the entire district showing where Edgewick was formerly located and Rattlesnake Lake in which the town of Cedar Falls was formerly thriving. It shows the location of the new masonry dam and the old temporary or crib dam, Mount Washington, the north bank, and the rock ribbed mountain on the south of west, all of which were intended for the walls of the great natural reservoir, provided the north bank had not been porous.” – The Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1921

“The arrow on the map shows where the big eruption took place at midnight, December 23, 1918, hurling a million and a half yards of rocks, earth, and gravel for miles around, opening up a creek, now called ‘Christmas Creek,’ which flowed on to Boxley Creek, causing it to rise and to add flood damage to the inhabitants of Edgewick. The town was completely destroyed. The map gives a graphic picture of the entire district showing where Edgewick was formerly located and Rattlesnake Lake in which the town of Cedar Falls was formerly thriving. It shows the location of the new masonry dam and the old temporary or crib dam, Mount Washington, the north bank, and the rock ribbed mountain on the south of west, all of which were intended for the walls of the great natural reservoir, provided the north bank had not been porous.” – The Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1921

Houses were toppled over, a shingle mill swept away, a lumber mill flooded and a section of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad’s main line washed out this morning when the McCann Shingle Company’s dam near Edgewick gave way as the result of pressure of water caused by leakage from the city’s Cedar River dam. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 28, 1993

The railroad depot at Cedar Falls, where extra engines were added to eastbound trains, bore the town’s name in foot-high electric letters.

The railroad depot at Cedar Falls, where extra engines were added to eastbound trains, bore the town’s name in foot-high electric letters.

Not only did a river run through it, but so did the railroad and a whole lot of power from the nation’s first publicly-owned hydroelectric plant.

It was like living on Walton’s Mountain, only with more people.

Cedar Falls wasn’t totally cut off from the Big City or the Big Wars or the Depression. In a very vital way, the tiny community in the Cascade foothills above North Bend was linked to all that.

“Cedar Falls was a unique little town that was created and flourished in the first half of the 20th century and then essentially disappeared in the face of changes in society and technology that erased its reason for existence,” wrote Marian Thompson Arlin and Dorothy Graybael Scott. (more…)

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From the original manuscript of Guy Reed Ramsey, “Post Offices of King County,” unpublished.

W.D. Gibbon store and post office, Maple Valley, 1903. L. to R: (unidentified), Mr. Gibbon, Mrs. Gibbon, Chester Gibbon, Mrs. Thomas G. Spaight (Mr. Gibbon’s sister) -- others unidentified. Courtesy of the Maple Valley Historical Society.

W.D. Gibbon store and post office, Maple Valley, 1903. L. to R: (unidentified), Mr. Gibbon, Mrs. Gibbon, Chester Gibbon, Mrs. Thomas G. Spaight (Mr. Gibbon’s sister) — others unidentified. Courtesy of the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The [Arthur] post office was named for a son of Charles O. Russell, the first white child born in that part of Maple Valley. It was conducted in the Russell home and mail was brought to it by neighbors from Renton.

Mr. Russell built a water-powered sawmill at the site of Maple Valley, moved Arthur post office and renamed it. This move was to his advantage as he had the service of the newly constructed Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad (later the Pacific Coast Railroad).

[Location on Cedar River 11 miles southeast of Renton, 7 miles northwest of Black Diamond, 12 miles northeast of Kent (NE/SE Section 9, T22N, R6E).] (more…)

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