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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Lake’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1953

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Searchers today found the wreckage and two survivors of a C-46 transport that crashed early yesterday on a 4,200-foot ridge, less than a mile from where a DC-3 struck the Cascades foothills April 14. Two other men aboard the C-46 were dead.

The wreckage of the twin-engined, 40-passenger plane lay in timber on the snowy slopes of the ridge, a mile southwest of Cedar Lake in the Cedar River watershed of South Central King County. (more…)

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