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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Mountain’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 1, 1890

In this same great county are 100,000 acres of coal lands. Their active development began twenty years ago, 4,918 tons of coal being shipped to San Francisco in 1871. From year to year the output has increased, until now in amounts to 600,000 tons, and until it has amounted in all to 3,830,000 tons since the beginning, against 2,835,000 tons from all other parts of the state combined.

The principal mines are those of Newcastle, Cedar Mountain, Black Diamond, Franklin, Gilman, and Durham, new mines being those at Black River, Kangley, and Niblock. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 9, 1980

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

TAHOMA-RAVEN HEIGHTS — More than 115 years ago the discovery of vast coal deposits drew settlers to the remote Squak Mountain, Issaquah and Newcastle regions. But now the sprawling reserves of undeveloped land are spawning rapid growth in the 150-square mile area from Issaquah south to Black Diamond.

So last August, King County planners assisting a citizens’ committee began the tremendous task of planning for the future of what is called the Tahoma/Raven Heights Communities Plan area—the largest plan undertaken so far.

A recently prepared profile on Tahoma/Raven Heights shows that between 1970 and 1980, the population has grown from about 19,500 to about 26,000. And forecasts indicate a population of almost 40,000 by 1990. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, April 2, 1961

(This is the first in a series of articles which will appear from time to time about lost towns of King County.)

By Lucile McDonald

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Overlooking the site of the mining community of Cedar Mountain is a window on the south side of the home of Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh. On the table were deeds to the Cavanaugh land, signed by Presidents Grant and Arthur. —Times photo by Roy Scully.

Lost towns of King County rival in mystery the ghost towns of gold-mine country. The thing about them is that most have vanished without a trace—not so much as a weathered heap of timber or a false-front abandoned store to indicate that at this or that road junction stood a community of several hundred persons.

Any map of 50 years ago or more is sprinkled with place names where nothing to indicate a community exists today. Some of them were swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Others died from natural causes.

Who could find Taylor, Kerriston, Cedar Mountain, Sherwood, Eddyville, and Barneston today? Who would know about Henry’s Switch, Atkinson, Trude, Holmar, Herrick, Danville, and Durham?

Yet, these names remain on the map, monuments to another time, when coal mines and sawmills attracted population to the foothills of the Cascades. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 26, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

This administration building of Pacific Coast Coal Co. was constructed in 1927 to serve as a combination office and shop for New Black Diamond mine. A powerhouse was located in the east end of the building, which was located at 18825 State Route 169, about halfway between Maple Valley and Renton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 11, 1977

By Diana Kalanquin

The Petersen sisters by their parlor stove along with the author of this article, Diana Kalanquin.

The Petersen sisters by their parlor stove along with the author of this article, Diana Kalanquin.

Ellen and Anna Petersen have lived in Maple Valley for 80 years—all their lives.

They remember the Indians, sleigh rides in the winter, the old-time schools, all-day trips to Renton, and much more.

The Petersens started school shortly after the turn of the century at Crosson School, which is now the Judd home.

“We remember,” they said, “when the Indians came every October to pick cranberries on Otter Lake. He could hear the rigs come in some way off, and our teacher, Miss Carrie Smith, would tell us, “You better be good or the Indians will get you.”

“Believe me, you could hear a pin drop in that school!” Anna recalled. “Everybody ducked their heads under their desks.”

This interviewer was given the impression that the arrows were going to start flying any minute.

Asked if they were afraid of the Indians, the two sisters replied, “We weren’t scared of them; we were scared of what we’d heard about them.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 22, 1889

Gilman and Cedar Mountain shut down—Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin running

Knights of Labor seal

Knights of Labor seal

The trouble among the coal miners in the territory has broken out again, and this time it seems to be general. There is no telling what or when the end will be.

The officers of the various coal companies in this city were greatly surprised to learn from telegrams received from the mines early yesterday morning that the miners had refused to go to work until the difficulties at Newcastle were adjusted to suit the Knights of Labor, and that the refusal was in obedience to an order issued by the district master workman located at Tacoma. (more…)

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