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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Mountain’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 5, 1925

Near the foot of Queen Anne Hill, corner of Taylor Avenue and Roy Street, P.J. Emt has a coal yard to which he is attracting city-wide attention. Some time ago he erected at one corner of the yard an exact replica of a fireplace, with a brick chimney, basket grate, and tile front.

Grouped before the grate are two settees upon which are often seated numbers of the neighborhood children, while before them blazes cheerily a fire of Diamond Briquets. This fire lasts all through the night, so that workmen going to their tasks before dawn, have commented upon the lasting qualities of a fuel which, hours later, still glows so brightly as they pass. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 18, 1918

Though Cedar River boasts more fishermen per square foot along its banks than any other stream in King County, it is still favored by local anglers who follow the river up to its head at Landsberg. The usual run of fishermen stop off about six miles below this point at Maple Valley or else fish anywhere between Renton and Cedar Mountain, but these are old grounds habituated by numbers of picnic parties and campers who spoil any chance for real sport. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

As the community’s committee prepares for its annual August Old-Timers Picnic, we look back at an earlier picnic and those who first came more than 100 years ago.

Since 1919, the Maxwell girls, Mattie and Donia, had been bringing together early settlers for the annual picnic. In 1921, the gathering was held at Hall’s Grove, and the theme for the event honored those old-timers who were in the Valley before 1900.

New officers for the following year were elected: W.D. Gibbon, president; Mattie Maxwell, treasurer; and Katherine Bond Hubbard, secretary. The newly elected officers gave future events a formal name: Maplevalley Pioneers’ Association. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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