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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Mountain’

Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, July 14, 1921

Dobson says work will be done as soon as possible and when money is available

The overhead bridge across the Milwaukee railroad in Maplevalley will be installed as soon as possible, said Commissioner Thomas Dobson in an interview Wednesday.

“Granges may pass resolutions from now until doomsday but without the money it is impossible for us to do the work at the present time although we realize the necessity for it and would like very much to see it built,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, July 4, 1908

Deputy detailed to catch criminal abandons the chase

Must the law take a holiday?

If so there is a man who attempted murder in King County today who is escaping the consequences of his crime.

After a few hours of half-hearted work last night the pursuit of John Willard, aged 58, a farmer living in Maple Valley, at the foot of Cedar Mountain, who attempted murder, according to his own wife’s statement, has been dropped for the time being. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 20, 1927

Three towns will be served by splendid structure in Union District on Cedar River

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

Like a youngster who appears wearing his first long trousers, the Seattle community shows its rapid growth by definite new things. Just as such a boy surprises you some morning, so do pleasant surprises like the new Union High School at Maplevalley, hit the observer with not unpleasant frequency.

The Tahoma High School opens tomorrow in a $65,000 building a mile east of Maplevalley, and twenty-nine miles from downtown Seattle.

All that region, which is tapped by the Cedar River, along which is a paved road almost to the town of Maplevalley, is on the rise. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 1, 1896

A petition for a bridge across Cedar River at Maple Valley was filed with the board of county commissioners yesterday, with fifty influential signatures, setting forth that the road of which the bridge would form a part is a convenient outlet from main roadways on all sides, connecting on the east with the Sagerson, Witte, Black Diamond, and Kent roads, for all of which it makes the shortest possible connections with the roads to Sherwood, Snoqualmie Falls, Issaquah, Cedar Mountain, and Renton.

The petition further recites that fording at the point named is impractical at some seasons and always attended with more or less danger. Many of the people living south of Cedar River are practically cut off from Maple Valley, although some of them contrive to cross on the railroad trestle.

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