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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Mountain’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 27, 1927

Extension by Puget Sound Company will be ready for service tomorrow

Extension of the service of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company to the town of Maple Valley from Renton, effective tomorrow, was announced today by M.T. Crawford, superintendent of distribution. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2005

By Barbara Nilson

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Eighty-four years of memories will be on tap, Sunday, Feb. 12, [2006,] at the Grange Hall, when Francis Niemela recalls life with the Finnish community on Lake Francis. His parents, Charles and Katri Niemela, came to Maple Valley and purchased 20 acres at the lake in 1915.

During that time there was a railroad that came around the lake and his Dad picked up railroad ties and built his first house out of them. Later that building was converted to a sauna and also used for smoking salmon and bacon when they constructed a large loghouse in 1918. That home was later purchased by the Dufenhorst family.

The Finns at Lake Francis had little stump ranches and their saunas in place of indoor plumbing. Niemela said the greatest sauna was the Lahtinen’s. It was open house every Saturday night and Mrs. Lahtinen would serve coffee and goodies. “Some of the offspring of those Finns like Walt Sipila and Walt Miller are still here,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, July 14, 1921

Dobson says work will be done as soon as possible and when money is available

The overhead bridge across the Milwaukee railroad in Maplevalley will be installed as soon as possible, said Commissioner Thomas Dobson in an interview Wednesday.

“Granges may pass resolutions from now until doomsday but without the money it is impossible for us to do the work at the present time although we realize the necessity for it and would like very much to see it built,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, July 4, 1908

Deputy detailed to catch criminal abandons the chase

Must the law take a holiday?

If so there is a man who attempted murder in King County today who is escaping the consequences of his crime.

After a few hours of half-hearted work last night the pursuit of John Willard, aged 58, a farmer living in Maple Valley, at the foot of Cedar Mountain, who attempted murder, according to his own wife’s statement, has been dropped for the time being. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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