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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar Mountain’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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By Morda C. Slauson, 1958

Thanksgiving of 1862 was celebrated royally in a log cabin on the Duwamish River. Jacob Maple, his sons and daughters and two young men, Henry Van Asselt and Luther W. Collins, sat at a rough board table and gave thanks for the safe completion of a long, dangerous journey and the reuniting of a family.

Jacob and his son, Samuel, who had first arrived on Puget Sound in 1851, had just returned from a trip to the middle west, bringing the rest of the family to become the first permanent settlers of the Duwamish valley.

Faded land deeds, relating to the Maple property, now owned by Boeing Airplane Company, are among the souvenirs of Seattle’s early years which are cherished by Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh, 16020 196th Ave., Maple Valley. Her late husband, Fred Cavanaugh, was born in 1871 in the family home on the present site of Boeing Field, son of Mary Ann Maple and Martin L. Cavanaugh. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 13, 1925

Robert A. Dinsmore, 1818 Terry Ave., victim of accident at coal mine near Renton

In a fall of forty-two feet from a staging erected around the bunkers of the West Coast Coal Company mine at Cedar Mountain, six miles south of Renton, Robert A. Dinsmore, 42 years old, a carpenter, 1818 Terry Ave., Seattle, was almost instantly killed late yesterday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 1, 1890

In this same great county are 100,000 acres of coal lands. Their active development began twenty years ago, 4,918 tons of coal being shipped to San Francisco in 1871. From year to year the output has increased, until now in amounts to 600,000 tons, and until it has amounted in all to 3,830,000 tons since the beginning, against 2,835,000 tons from all other parts of the state combined.

The principal mines are those of Newcastle, Cedar Mountain, Black Diamond, Franklin, Gilman, and Durham, new mines being those at Black River, Kangley, and Niblock. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

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