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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This January 20, 1948 photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This January 20, 1948, photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This column’s focus over the next several weeks will be the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), previously known as the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). Perhaps no other single venture was more important to the development of the Maple Valley–Black Diamond area than the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 8, 1977

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

Construction of the low level discharge control valve at the Cedar River Masonry Dam at Morse Lake, which had been planned for this summer, has been postponed for one year, according to a letter received recently from Gordon Vickery, superintendent of Seattle City Light.

The letter was sent to A.B. (Bud) Veleke, president of the Cedar River Home Owners’ Protective Association.

Vickery explains that the disastrously low water conditions affecting City Light’s power supply in 1977 has made the postponement necessary. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 27, 1906

Grading expected to be far enough advanced by that time to permit contractors to construct new tracks

Right-of-way through Cedar River Valley will be improved as soon as the franchise ordinance permits

Line reaching for Tacoma beyond Black River Junction will parallel the Puget Sound Electric Company

Actual track laying will commence on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul’s line in this state by fall. Grading on the extension up Cedar River Valley from the point near Maple Valley where the St. Paul leaves the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound, will begin as soon as the company is notified of the approval of its franchise ordinance.

The camps will be established within a few days. The mills of the state are so busy with orders for rail and cargo shipment that they will be unable to handle the big contract the St. Paul will have to let. As a result a number of portable mills will be sent into the woods along the right of way of the St. Paul and ties will be gotten out at convenient points. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 11, 1977

Maple Valley’s Seafair Princess — Lori Prinzing

Maple Valley’s Seafair Princess — Lori Prinzing

Lori Jan Prinzing, a Tahoma High School senior, was selected by the Greater Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce last week as this area’s Miss Seafair Princess for 1977.

She will represent Maple Valley throughout Seafair (July 28 through August 7) and will be eligible for selection as regional Miss Seafair at the end of that period.

She will also be honored during Maple Valley Days, including the parade on June 7.

Designated as alternate was Nancy Jo Simmons, also a senior at Tahoma High School. Close runner-ups in the balloting were Susan Treick, Dianne Ticknor, and Lorraine Millet, all Tahoma seniors. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 10, 1884

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall, principal owner of the Black Diamond coal mines in this county, arrived from San Francisco on the Queen last evening, accompanied by his wife and son. In a brief interview with a Post Intelligencer reported last night, Mr. Cornwall said:

“We have expended a large sum of money in developing our Black Diamond mine in this county—considerably over sixty-thousand dollars—and cannot do much more until the railroad is completed to our mine. We have a contract with the Oregon Improvement Company for the transportation of our coal to Seattle, and are very much disappointed that the Cedar River extension is not being pushed ahead.

“We have made arrangements for the shipment of our coal from this city to the markets of the world, and all that is keeping us back is the failure of the Oregon Improvement Company to complete the road. We are willing to advance them sufficient money with what they have, to complete the road to our mines, and we are waiting to hear from New York now.

“I shall be on the Sound several weeks, during which time I shall visit Whatcom, to look after extensive interests at that point.”

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