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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 16, 1884

On Saturday the Cedar River extension was completed to the Black Diamond coal mines. These are the mines owned by D.O. Mills, P.B. Cornwall, and others, and machinery will be rushed in just as soon as possible.

The Black Diamond Company has expended over $100,000 in developing this mine already, and expects to be shipping coal to San Francisco very soon.

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 1977

Cedar River turned big, brown, and ugly again on December 2nd and 3rd this year on the exact anniversary of the 1975 major flood. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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By Morda C. Slauson, 1958

Thanksgiving of 1862 was celebrated royally in a log cabin on the Duwamish River. Jacob Maple, his sons and daughters and two young men, Henry Van Asselt and Luther W. Collins, sat at a rough board table and gave thanks for the safe completion of a long, dangerous journey and the reuniting of a family.

Jacob and his son, Samuel, who had first arrived on Puget Sound in 1851, had just returned from a trip to the middle west, bringing the rest of the family to become the first permanent settlers of the Duwamish valley.

Faded land deeds, relating to the Maple property, now owned by Boeing Airplane Company, are among the souvenirs of Seattle’s early years which are cherished by Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh, 16020 196th Ave., Maple Valley. Her late husband, Fred Cavanaugh, was born in 1871 in the family home on the present site of Boeing Field, son of Mary Ann Maple and Martin L. Cavanaugh. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 20, 1966

By Rod Cardwell

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

MAPLE VALLEY, King County — Born 70 years ago in Italy, an ex-barber named Joe Mezzavilla still makes wine for his own table and is quite particular and uses only the best grapes from California.

And it is obviously a good medicine because he is a fine figure of a man, tall and erect … and with a full head of Latin-dark hair streaked with distinguished gray.

He has no use for most store-bought wines. In the accent of his native Venice, he explains, “I’m a make mine with a no sugar, no fortified stuff.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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