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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 7, 1979

The above plaque, now attached to the front of the Maple Valley Food Center building at SE 216th and Maple Valley Highway, was unveiled Saturday evening, Oct. 27, with Joe Mezzavilla and thirteen members of his immediate family in attendance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 3, 1979

By Dianne Wilson

Quiet elegance, country charm, and comfortable atmosphere can all be used to describe The Dinner House, Black Diamond’s answer to the restaurant needs of the area. For the first time diners can enjoy a good meal in pleasant surroundings without driving a distance.

Last week my son Eric and I responded to the claim of “only the best.” Former patrons of Morganville Tavern would not recognize the place. Walls and ceilings are a warm, deep rose-red. Antique lovers will appreciate the authentic tables and chairs, interspersed with quality pieces including a lonely old sideboard and a china closet with beveled glass, as well as old-style bric-a-brac. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 19, 1979

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

Further plans regarding the expansion of salmon rearing facilities at the Seattle Water Department Park on the Cedar River near Landsburg have been announced by the State Department of Fisheries. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton News Record, August 20, 1959

This swarm of girls is only part of the 300 who took part in closing day ceremonies at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on Cedar River last Thursday. Each of the 16 groups gave a skit or demonstration as their part of the closing activities.

This swarm of girls is only part of the 300 who took part in closing day ceremonies at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on Cedar River last Thursday. Each of the 16 groups gave a skit or demonstration as their part of the closing activities.

At least 7,000 Greater Renton area youngsters had a taste of outdoor living this summer through participation in organized day camping at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on the Cedar River.

When the program closed for the summer last Friday, Gene Coulon said at least 7,000 boys and girls from 7 to 13 had visited the camp on a strictly organized basis plus several hundred more under the sponsorship of churches, community, and other youth groups. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 28, 1907

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Piledriver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Pile driver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

When one of the greatest common carriers of the country announced its determination to extend its line to the Pacific Coast, with Seattle as its terminal, excitement waxed for the customary nine days and then waned. During that time the land through which it was foreordained the road must pass advanced enormously in value, changed hands countless times, and finally became stably established in price on the market.

The advent of the great road was more or less a matter of futurity, the public was too busily occupied with the immediate present to concern itself with the future and the activities of the road were forgotten. But while the public has neglected to take cognizance of its operations, they have nevertheless been productive of results.

Armies of workmen are scattered along its roadbed for hundreds of miles, its construction work has now been extended to practically the outskirts of the city and it be only a matter of a few months before the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul again commands the attention of the public by sending its first train over the completed road to Seattle.

At Maple Valley, twenty-two miles from Seattle, the construction work has been going on rapidly. The railroad’s efforts are centered on the seven miles intervening between the intake of the Cedar River water system and Maple Valley. Beyond the intake the operations are confined almost entirely to clearing the right of way to North Bend, where the road is also engaged in construction work on a large scale. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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