Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 28, 1976

In the pioneer, bicentennial spirit is this log house going up on the Lower Dorre Don Way. It’s on the river, and how do the owners feel about that? ‘We love it, they say.’ (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

In the pioneer, bicentennial spirit is this log house going up on the Lower Dorre Don Way. It’s on the river, and how do the owners feel about that? ‘We love it,’ they say. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

A log house is something Ronald and Bonnie Keller have always wanted.

Day by day their dream is slowly unfolding as the pioneer-style log house is gradually rising on a riverside site at 29225 Lower Dorre Don Way S.E.

“The only way we could get a permit to build here on the river was to flood-proof our house,” Keller said last week.

“We had to put a 48-foot concrete foundation on an 8-foot-footing in order to have the house above the 100-year flood plain,” he explained.

The Kellers are doing most of the work themselves with the help of relatives and friends. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 19, 1908

Hold-up man attempts to rob Maple Valley saloon, but bartender resists—robber escapes and is arrested in Seattle

After having on Tuesday night engaged in a desperate hand-to-hand fight with the bartender of Pat Quinnan’s saloon at Maple Valley, while attempting to hold up the place, as a result of which he escaped minus his coat, mask, and hat, Ben Dixon, aged 26, was captured last evening in his room at the Alaska Commercial hotel in this city. The arrest was made by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich and his assistant, Matt O’Grady, of Ravensdale. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 6, 1927

Auburn party visits New Black Diamond Mine

Learn fine points of underground work at new property of Pacific Coast Coal Company

By Ellis Coe

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

To a novice in the coal mining business, who has never been further underground than the depth of his neighbor’s cellar, a trip of more than one mile into the heart of a mountain of coal is somewhat of an experience. Further than that, when blasting operations begin while this same novice is underground, it heightens the interest in the experience. The question as to whether the stay in the heart of the mountain will be permanent immediately enters the mind of the quasi coal digger, with the odds in favor of permanency. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 27, 1927

Extension by Puget Sound Company will be ready for service tomorrow

Extension of the service of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company to the town of Maple Valley from Renton, effective tomorrow, was announced today by M.T. Crawford, superintendent of distribution. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »