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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1884

James Colman (1832-1906)

James Colman (1832-1906)

“You know my business,” said a reporter, as he approached Mr. James M. Colman yesterday, pencil and book in hand, eager to learn and jot down any items of interest which that gentleman, who had just arrived from San Francisco, might be willing to give.

“Yes, I know your business. I know that you are after me for news, and I haven’t any for you.”

“Well, what have you been doing in San Francisco during the past three or four weeks?” continued the news gatherer.

“Well,” replied Mr. Colman, “while there I got out the patters and ordered a pair of direct-acting hoist engines, to be used in raising coal from the slope in our mine on Cedar River to the surface of the ground. I also ordered a sawmill, which will have a capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is to be used in and about the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 10, 1977

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

A number of friends, co-workers, and their spouses brought refreshments and gifts on Saturday afternoon, July 30, to the Maple Valley railroad station to wish Don Vernor well upon his retirement as dispatcher and telegrapher after nearly 33 years at that post.

He had been “on the job” in Maple Valley since January 1945. For three years prior to that he worked as dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada.

“A train dispatcher’s job,” Vernor explains, “is to keep track at all times of the trains in his area. We always have telephone contact station to station.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 13, 1887

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

The logging industry in the heart of the county has of late been receiving some attention. A few months ago George Ames put in a camp at Maple Valley post office, at the fourth crossing of Cedar River, on the Cedar River extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and is now getting out about 10,000 feet of logs a day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This January 20, 1948 photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This January 20, 1948, photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This column’s focus over the next several weeks will be the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), previously known as the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). Perhaps no other single venture was more important to the development of the Maple Valley–Black Diamond area than the railroad. (more…)

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