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Posts Tagged ‘Cedar River’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 18, 1918

Though Cedar River boasts more fishermen per square foot along its banks than any other stream in King County, it is still favored by local anglers who follow the river up to its head at Landsberg. The usual run of fishermen stop off about six miles below this point at Maple Valley or else fish anywhere between Renton and Cedar Mountain, but these are old grounds habituated by numbers of picnic parties and campers who spoil any chance for real sport. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Bud and Ora Mable (Babe) relax in the living room of their remodeled cabin they purchased in Orchard Grove 61 years ago. Photo by Barbara Nilson.

In 1946 Babe Bodvin was traveling down Dorre Don Way visiting a friend of her mother’s when she spotted a two-room cabin for sale. It was owned by a doctor who had built it in 1936. She went home to Seattle to ask her husband, Bud, if they could buy it at $850 for an acre of ground and the cabin. He said yes and 61 years later they’re still there.

They celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary in April. Bud said they were married in her folk’s home right where the Space Needle is today. Her folks, Charles and Capitoly Werl, later moved to Hobart in the 1940s.

Bud said, “All there was to the cabin was a kitchen and the room that is now their living room, nothing else; no ceilings, no running water, an outhouse, we used the fireplace for heat.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Photo taken approximately 1935. Standing in front of house (23360 Dorre Don Way) built by Gus and Rachael on property bought from Uncle John. They purchased about 15 acres of the land that was not platted on the east side of the road. From the left, back row: William Bradford, Gus Christy; left in front row: Mary (Daniels) Bradford, Rosalie Christy, William Christy, and Rachael (Bradford) Christy. Photo loaned by Marla Young.

Thanks to Sandy Faul and Marla Young for their responses to the request in the spring Bugle for information on Dorre Don and Orchard Grove.

Marla Young e-mailed, “l saw the article in The Bugle requesting information about Dorre Don and Orchard Grove. My family lived on both the Dorre Don portion of the road and Orchard Grove for many years.

“My Great Uncle John Daniels owned all of the land now known as Orchard Grove and approximately 40 acres on the other side of the railroad. In 1919 he subdivided the land between the road and river into lots and called it Orchard Grove. Apparently, there was a remnant orchard on part of the land when he purchased the property.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Post-Intelligencer, June 26, 1884

The idea of subsidizing the Columbia & Puget Sound Company to enable it to complete its road up Cedar River was a good one, but not so good as another that has since been put forth. The new idea is to loan the company the needed money, and it was proposed by Mr. Howard, the company’s representative. The terms upon which the money is to be loaned will strike the reader as most fair, and will be found reported in full in the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 13, 1989

Maple Valley Day’s Cedar River offers a mecca for summer fun as these youngsters have discovered. — VOICE photo by Teresa Hensley. This young Sonics fan had a prominent spot in the recent Maple Valley Day Parade.

The judges had a difficult task in trying to decide winners among the many excellent entries in the June 2 Maple Valley Day Parade. Their final category decisions are listed below.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 1: 1st, Renaissance “A” Team; 2nd, Drill-A-Rines; 3rd, Ballard Eagles Jr. Drill Team.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 2: 1st, Burien Eagles Drill Team; 2nd, Renaissance “B” Team.

JEEP UNITS: 1st, Green River Valley Jeepers; 2nd, Powerline Pounders. (more…)

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