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Posts Tagged ‘cemetery’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 25, 1990

A crowd of neighbors and patrons packed into the Black Diamond City Hall Thursday night to show their support for live music at Boots Tavern.

In response, the council granted the Third Avenue business an extension of its cabaret license until Dec. 31.

A petition with 197 signatures, 51 from Black Diamond, in favor of live music was presented at the public hearing before the city council on Thursday night and eight people took the podium in the tavern’s defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, July 22, 2011

By TJ Martinell

The Black Diamond baseball team, circa 1915. Behind the squad is the grandstand filled with enthusiastic spectators as the sport was a passion for many in town.

The Black Diamond baseball team, circa 1915. Behind the squad is the grandstand filled with enthusiastic spectators as the sport was a passion for many in town.

Compared to the other sports in Black Diamond, baseball truly was in a league of its own.

It was America’s pastime, but for the town, it was a matter of pride.

Black Diamond was a part of the Valley League, which included towns such as Franklin, Renton, Kent, Auburn, Sumner, and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Welsh descendant Joseph J. Thomas, 9, was laid to rest in the Black Diamond Cemetery in 1890 after being killed by a coal train.

Steeped in a rich heritage of life centered on coal mining, Black Diamond, which was the third largest city in the state of Washington at one time, could also boast of the many European immigrants settling in and around the bustling town.

One of the countries represented in the area was Wales. Between 1882 and 1885 a whole town of Welsh families from California moved to Washington bringing with them not only their rich Welsh inheritance, but also the name of their town—Black Diamond (known at times in California during that time period as Nortonville and today as Pittsburgh).

Along with their rich heritage, the families brought with them their mining tools and equipment in addition to their furnishings. Many of these items will be on view at the Black Diamond Museum during their 5th annual Welsh Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, June 7. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, May 25, 2000

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND — The Black Diamond Cemetery is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Word of the listing came earlier this week in time for today’s public hearing by the City of Black Diamond Landmarks Commission to make the nearly 120-year-old cemetery a city and county landmark.

The cemetery, which is still used today, illustrates broad historic, ethnic, and cultural patterns of the company coal mining town that was Black Diamond at the turn of the century, according to Kate Krafft, historic landmarks coordinator for King County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, May 20, 2011

By TJ Martinell

The grave of Alice Gertrude Johnson in the Franklin Cemetery. The date of birth and death read: January 1, 1902 – January 7, 1902. TJ Martinell, The Reporter

When I think of a ghost town, a tableau of the iconic “High Noon” spaghetti-western comes into mind. It is a row of ramshackle wooden buildings that form two lines like opposing armies in a battle. There is the requisite saloon door dangling on one hinge, while a ball of tumbleweed sweeps through the dry and barren street. Aside from a gust of wind, bringing in dust devils and a hot dry breeze, the environment has an eerie silence to it.

As I explored the area near Green River with Dan Hutson, a member of the Black Diamond Historical Society, where the town of Franklin once was, I perceived that, as a ghost town, it has none of these qualities. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of Valley, May 16, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

In 1920 Fred Habenicht, holding a hand saw, supervised the unloading of the new hydraulic mine motor vehicle or pulling loaded mine cars from water level tunnel to the Continental Coal Co. bunker (in the background). It replaced mules in the mine. Miners are: 18-year-old Vern Habenicht; Bob Kingen Sr., Frenchy Ferdinand Maigre; Evor Morgan, holding the chain; and onlooker Bill Baldwin. (Photo—Habenicht collection from Ravensdale Reflections book)

Before the turn of the 20th century, coal seams ran from the shores of Lake Washington to the foot of the Cascade mountains leading to the establishment of towns at the mine sites, some of which are still in existence, i.e., Renton, Black Diamond, Cumberland, Issaquah, Wilkeson, and Ravensdale. Some linger in memory only, i.e., Franklin, Elk, Bayne, Durham, Danville, Eddyville, Taylor, and Landsburg.

From the year 1888 through 1967, there were an amazing 232 coal seams being tapped in King County and operated by 157 different companies. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 3, 1961

By Frank Lynch

Richard H. Parry and son Elvede with account of mine disaster (Post-Intelligencer photo).

Found (and at long, long last)—

A regional folk song and a regional hero.

Richard H. Parry lives at 4429 Rainier Ave. He was born in Wales, and he is a retired coal miner.

Some several weeks ago one of his sons, Arthur, found a Welsh language Bible at Goodwill. He bought same, presented it to his dad, and the elder Parry was delighted with it—and for several reasons.

The Bible is a handsome one—and well-illustrated. It is certainly very old.

There were several bits of Americana hidden in the pages—a Blue Ribbon Army (Temperance) pledge card, some Christmas cards, and scraps of Welsh verse and copy of a song sung over our own land by one W.D. Reese and entitled—

“The disaster at Franklin.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Kent News Journal, April 16, 1987

By Bruce Rommel
Staff Reporter

Black Diamond city employee Larry Marks, on ground, Carl Steiert and Ted Barner inspect one of damaged monuments. Staff photo by Bruce Rommel.

Julia Gallagher was only 15 when she died on April 18, 1889. Somebody remembers. They regularly clean the ornate marble marker over her grave at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

Brushed and scrubbed to a dull white, Julia’s monument stood out amidst dozens of aged and graying monuments, making it a tempting target two nights ago.

It was one of nearly 40 historic monuments toppled or broken by vandals in the cemetery, where early residents of the coal-mining community were first laid to rest in wood coffins in the 1880s. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 4, 1911

Masons conduct impressive funeral service for Samuel A. Tomes, who lost life in Taylor explosion

Casket draped with floral offerings: Company suspends operations and closes offices for day—business associates attend internment

Attended by friends, business associates, and brother Masons, funeral services for Samuel A. Tomes, superintendent of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, who was killed by a blast in mine No. 2 of the workings at Taylor Saturday afternoon, were held in Butterworth’s chapel this afternoon. Internment following in Mount Pleasant cemetery. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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