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Posts Tagged ‘cemetery’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 23, 1940

Superior Court Judge Donald A. McDonald will be the main speaker and Attorney Anne Marie Olson, will be mistress of ceremonies at exercises dedicating a monument on the site of the first school in the Maple Valley District Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Highline Church, between Maple Valley and Hobart.

The monument will have a niche in which pioneers of the area are urged to deposit relics pertaining to the school’s early days. The school was erected in 1881, and served the region for years.

The marker will be unveiled by one of the school’s first teachers, Mrs. Mary B. McManus of Zenith, who taught pupils of Maple Valley during the term of 1882-1883. The project is under the sponsorship of the Maple Valley Pioneers’ Association.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 30, 1983

By Eric Pryne
Times staff reporter

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

BLACK DIAMOND — Their addresses may be the same, but they really are two communities—one old, one new—in and around this historic Southeast King County town.

The coal industry built Black Diamond a century ago. It was a bustling mining town with colonies of Welshmen, Italians, Slavs, and Finns—and a population three times larger than today.

But oil replaced coal in most of America’s furnaces, and Black Diamond already had begun fading by the 1930s. Today its best known export is bread from the bakery. The hills around town produce only a pittance of coal.

Even so, the mineral’s imprint on Black Diamond is everywhere. A mountain of slag and a coal car by the highway mark the entrance to town.

A stone in the cemetery tells, in Italian, of three men who died in a 1910 mine explosion. Many of Black Diamond’s homes are old coal-company houses, built before World War I.

And, among Black Diamond’s 1,200 residents, a good number of miners still fondly remember the old days. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 11, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

When we initially talked with outgoing mayor Gomer Evans about this article, we asked that he give thought to three basic questions: “When you took office, what problems did you face?”; “What do you feel you accomplished during your term of office?”; and now, “Where do you go from here?” His description of the accomplishments clearly defines the problems faced. (more…)

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