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Posts Tagged ‘Chamber of Commerce’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 25, 1979

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

The old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course was destroyed in a spectacular fire on Sunday, April 8.

According to Ray Colman, owner of the well-known Maple Valley landmark, the fire started when two young boys set papers on fire inside the building. They were spotted leaving the building and were apprehended later when they returned to view the blaze.

The clubhouse dates back to 1929, Colman says. “It was where the Chamber of Commerce held their first meetings. The Lions Club also held their first meetings there, and for many years it was a social center for numerous other parties and groups in the area.”

The building was originally constructed by Kain Gaffney and Ed Long. They started out by serving chicken dinners there. Gaffney and Long at one time also owned the Lake Wilderness Golf Course and later Gaffney’s Resort on the lake. They were both well-known musicians in the area. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 29, 1971

By William A. Ziegner

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Once in a while, the Voice gets around to what is called a personality sketch. It’s high time we came up with another one and past high time that we bang out a few words about the now 75-year-old civic leader, who has often been called (and still is) “the Mayor of Maple Valley.”

He’s Joe Mezzavilla, of course, who still makes his own wine, still keeps on the go every day, all day, and still has the same friendly smile and charm he had with this writer first met him in about 1952.

Joe at that time was proprietor of the old Sure-Fine Cash Store, occupying a frame building next to where the present Serve-U is located, at first about half today’s size. Joe waited on his customers himself most of the time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September [day unknown], 2004

By Barbara Nilson

Labor Day button 2004Cream pies, politicians, and peanuts combined to create a memorable Labor Day weekend with citizen awards and plaques for parade winners. Ninety-one-year old Inez Aden was voted the Lifetime Commitment Award for her years of devotion to the Community Center. She said she had lived in Black Diamond for 91 years and she was shocked by this award.

Labor Day Committee Director Leih Mulvihill was honored as Citizen of the Year for her years of work with the Labor Day for her years of work with the Labor Day event as well as her participation in the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Hooked on Fishing committee, Black Diamond Merchant’s Association, newly elected to the City Planning Commission and other community services. Mulvihill responded with “I love this town!” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 27, 1974

VALLEY LANDMARK: The Hobart home site of Hubert and Pat Peacock. “Peacock’s Roost,” the second floor of the second building from the left, served for 20 years as a center for square dancers. The Peacocks are now living in it, having moved from their former residence, the first building seen on the left. (VOICE photo by Lowell Lorenz.)

VALLEY LANDMARK: The Hobart home site of Hubert and Pat Peacock. “Peacock’s Roost,” the second floor of the second building from the left, served for 20 years as a center for square dancers. The Peacocks are now living in it, having moved from their former residence, the first building seen on the left. (VOICE photo by Lowell Lorenz.)

By Laura Lorenz

A Peacock family has roosted at a Hobart home site since 1888.

The original home has had its face lifted throughout the years, enabling it to keep up with the needs of the five generations it has sheltered.

The home is nestled in a horseshoe-shaped valley looking towards the Cascade foothills and its driveway leads up the hill to S.E. 208th Street, known by old-timers as the McKibbon Road, but now referred to as the cemetery road. (more…)

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