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Posts Tagged ‘Chinese’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Still driving them out

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 11, 1886

A gentleman who came down from Franklin yesterday morning and induced the Franklin miners to join them for the purpose of driving the Chinamen out of Carbonado.

The crowd left Franklin during the forenoon about 90 strong, on foot, bound for Carbonado. They made no secret of their mission and talked as though they were prepared to carry it out.

The Carbonado mine is owned by the Pacific Improvement Company, a California corporation, and is the only mine in the territory where Chinamen are new or have for some months past been employed.

The company has been very firm in the matter, declaring that if the Chinese were not permitted to work the mine would be shut down. It is understood the officers of the company are determined and prepared to repel force by force, in which case it is not unlikely blood will be shed, as the miners who walked over there yesterday will certainly not return without making a very strong effort to accomplish their purpose.

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 16, 1885

A pressure is being brought to bear on all hands to displace Chinese with white labor, and from the appearance of things, the abolition of all Chinese labor in this locality is near at hand.

The Black Diamond Coal Company has given notice that all the Chinamen employed at its mines will be superseded by white men, and the Seattle Lumber and Commercial Company has discharged the Chinamen employed at its mill.

There are a great many unemployed white men looking for work, and it is to the interest of employers to give them employment, where such a thing is possible. If a little good judgment and common sense is needed, the labor question can be adjusted without further resort to violence, murder, and the destruction of valuable property.

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