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Posts Tagged ‘Christmas’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 10, 1925

Richard Goodhead, mine foreman at Burnett, has been a miner in this state almost as long as coal has been dug here. He has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett since the mine reopened several years ago, and prior to that time was at Franklin and Hyde mines.

Loyal to the company, and loyal to the men under him, he has built up the reputation of being a “Square-Shooter,” and a practical mining man. Proof of the esteem in which he is held is shown by the fact that his friends all call him “Dick.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 26, 1925

Pause a moment today to give thanks. Though joyous and festive the day, it is not enough to merely BE thankful, but he who fully appreciates the significance of the event will from a devout heart GIVE thanks.

This expression should not be simply for the abundance of material goods which a bountiful Providence has vouchsafed us, but we should rather thank God for the heritage of a great nation and the opportunities of the present. Give thanks for the Fate which made it possible for you to live in America; give thanks for what the future holds. Then, with a thankful heart, live up to the highest ideals of the nation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 29, 1925

Few coal camps in the country can boast of a wash house comparable with the splendid structure erected for that purpose in Carbonado. Of brick and hollow tile construction, with full cement floors, the building is modern throughout and equipped with every device for the comfort and convenience of the men.

Adding to its attractiveness is a neat lawn with ornamental flower beds in front of the building. A portion of the wing to the left is devoted to canteen purposes, providing pool tables and a stock of confectionery and tobacco for the men of the camp. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 1, 1925

Few towns in the country can boast as fine a general merchandise store as the new company institution in Burnett. Spacious and modern in every respect, the new store, under the direction of Manager L.W. Foreman is proving its worth to the community, and in turn the citizens of the camp are demonstrating their appreciation of the service by a constantly increasing patronage.

The Burnett store was opened in the new location early in November. Its well displayed stock, attractive windows, and showcases, must be seen to be appreciated. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 27, 1906

Takes two deputy sheriffs and six citizens to quell a disturbance at Bruce, near Black Diamond

Too much holiday liquor the cause. Officials are roughly handled until they get reinforcements, when belligerents submit quietly enough

The town of Bruce was located at the end of the Bruce Branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound RR. The branch paralleled the Green River Gorge Road and ended just south of Lake Twelve.

It took Deputy Sheriff Bob Hodge and a posse of seven men to suppress a riot at Bruce, three miles from Black Diamond, Tuesday night, in which a band of Italians were the participants. Too much Christmas liquid cheer was the inciting cause of the row. Three of the ring leaders, Marona Gibatta, Tony Biozo, and Valantini Areo, will celebrate New Year’s Day in the county jail. (more…)

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