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Posts Tagged ‘clay mining’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 16, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the Maple Valley railway depot was taken in 1948 as viewed looking northbound along the Maple Valley highway (aka SR-169). The depot was also used as the dispatcher’s office.

It was the second railroad station in Maple Valley, replacing the first constructed in 1885, when the original rail line was built to access coal from the newly developed town of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This January 20, 1948 photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This January 20, 1948, photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This column’s focus over the next several weeks will be the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), previously known as the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). Perhaps no other single venture was more important to the development of the Maple Valley–Black Diamond area than the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Taylor was a mining town located about 4 miles east of Hobart on a branch line of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. The area was first homesteaded by Sam Galloway, who discovered both coal and clay deposits in 1892.

Three years later the property was sold to Arthur Denny, who’d founded Seattle in 1852. He formed the Denny Clay Company, which opened the mines with the coal used to fire the clay manufactured into bricks, shingles, and sewer pipe. Over 633,000 tons of coal were mined and millions of clay products shipped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 22, 1889

Several more claims filed, a find of galena ore

fire-clayMr. James W. Bird, engineer of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and four others have located mining claims in township 21, range 6 east, between Black Diamond and Franklin, in which are situated four veins of fire clay, which have recently been discovered there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo shows the steel truss bridge in the late stages of construction when the roadway/deck was being surfaced.

This photo shows the steel truss bridge in the late stages of construction when the roadway/deck was being surfaced.

The Kummer Bridge was built from June 1932 to October 1933 to provide a more direct route between Black Diamond and Enumclaw. Can you imagine a bridge of this height (155 feet above the Green River); width (28 feet); and span (688 feet) being built in a mere 17 months today?

Originally called the Kummer Cut-off Bridge, it is now officially known as the Dan Evans/Green River Bridge, but often called the SR-169 or High Bridge. Its namesake, Kummer, was a nearby coal and clay mining community. (more…)

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Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, January 7, 1906

Former manager of Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Co. decides to take long rest after many years in business

George W. Kummer

George W. Kummer

George W. Kummer, who recently resigned the general managership of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, was the pioneer, organizer, and manager of the first developed factory for the manufacture of clay products in Seattle. To this work he gave sixteen years of unremitting effort, with the result that this industry is now one of the largest and most prosperous in this part of the country.

In 1890 Mr. Kummer took charge of the Puget Sound Fire Clay Company, which, under his management, made the first pressed brick and the first fire brick manufactured in Seattle. This company was reorganized in 1892 under the name of the Denny Clay Company, and during the past year a further reorganization was effected by the absorption of the Renton Clay and Coal Company, the new corporation becoming the Denny-Renton Clay and Coal Company. (more…)

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