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Posts Tagged ‘Coal Creek’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 3, 1924

Within the past week a German freighter, the Luise Hemsoth, and a British ocean carrier, the Ashworth, both took bunker coal at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, June 16, 1881

Early photo of Newcastle (near present day Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park) south of Bellevue.

Newcastle 1883

Newcastle, as most of our readers well know, is a coal mining town situated in the mountains, about twenty-two miles from Seattle.

The houses occupied by the miners are small, and as a general thing unpainted; and but little regularity exists in the location of buildings. When the mine was being opened, rude cabins were built wherever room between the stumps could be found, and they are still used, the miner paying a small rent each month for them. The houses built at a later date are much better and more convenient. The cottages occupied by the storekeeper, bookkeeper, superintendent, physician, and some other employees, are neat and comfortable. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. (more…)

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