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Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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Originally published in the News-Journal, May 4, 1980

Photos and text by Jennifer Werner

Carl Falk weighs in a truck at the Palmer Coking Coal Co.

Gas prices climb steadily, up to more than $1.20 a gallon. Fuel bills are rising to all-time highs, and the terms “conservation,” “TMI,” “China syndrome,” and “oil embargo” are the buzzwords of our generation.

As the alternatives to our dwindling energy resources become apparent, so does the attractiveness of one of the oldest fuels used by man. Coal.

Underneath the hills of Black Diamond there is an estimated 200 million tons of that black gold. So says Carl Falk, one of the co-owners of the
Palmer Coking Coal Co. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 29, 1926

Expressing their genuine pleasure at the recent return home of N.D. Moore, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Black Diamond Band last Saturday evening serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Moore at their home, 618 Fullerton Street, Seattle. The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Moore, who knew nothing whatever about it until the music started. After a short concert on the lawn the boys were invited in and served with refreshments. Accompanying the band were Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, and Geo. Upton.

Those in the band included Bandmaster Frank Carroll, Earl Manchester, Ray Rosso, Wm. Tretheway, H. Parkinson, VanManchester, Ed Lockridge, Thos. Hughes, G. Lile, F. Heister, Jim Boyd, H. Saarella, B.M. McVicar, Ed. Crossman, Al Winckworth, Fred Carroll, B. McDonald, Theo. Rouse, and Tony Schultz. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, April 25, 2002

Concrete block now encases meeting spot of coal miners’ union

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Paul Botts, left, 87, one of the last underground miners from Black Diamond, and Don Mason, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand at the Union Stump. Now enclosed in concrete, the old fir stump was used in 1907 in Black Diamond to rally miners and start a union. (Gary Kissel/JournaI)

BLACK DIAMOND — Paul Botts remembers seeing the Union Stump as a youngster.

Now 87, he is among the last of the underground coal miners still living in the area. And Botts still is a member of United Mine Workers Local 6481.

“Dues are $6 a month. And I still get benefits,” Botts said last week, leaning against the large, square block of concrete encasing the old fir stump—where union history was made nearly a century ago, debates were argued, rallies were held, and strikes were called.

Like mining itself, Local 6481 left Black Diamond years ago. Now the local is located in Ogden, Utah, Botts said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, April 21, 1995

By George Erb
Valley Daily News

Front-end loader, above, shovels dirt and rock into a truck to expose coal. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner.)

BLACK DIAMOND — In the earliest days, miners would tromp out of the tent city that was Black Diamond and go underground to pry coal from the earth with hand tools and explosives.

More than a century later, most work takes place in broad daylight at the John Henry Mine on the outskirts of town. The John Henry is an open pit, and even when the sun sets behind the debris piles, the work goes on under the glare of floodlights mounted on diesel generators.

Today’s miners are more likely to wrestle a steering wheel than swing a pick. For the most part, they are heavy equipment operators who drive oversized bulldozers, trucks, and front-end loaders. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, April 20, 2012

By TJ Martinell

A World War II memorial wall, which uses a cascading granite design. The Black Diamond Historical Society intends to use this design for its miner’s memorial wall.

The Black Diamond Historical Society is working on plans to erect a memorial statue and wall outside of its building.

According to President Keith Watson, the historical society started the project about two months ago after members visited the coal mining town of Roslyn near Cle Elum. (more…)

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Originally published in the Kent News Journal, April 16, 1987

By Bruce Rommel
Staff Reporter

Black Diamond city employee Larry Marks, on ground, Carl Steiert and Ted Barner inspect one of damaged monuments. Staff photo by Bruce Rommel.

Julia Gallagher was only 15 when she died on April 18, 1889. Somebody remembers. They regularly clean the ornate marble marker over her grave at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

Brushed and scrubbed to a dull white, Julia’s monument stood out amidst dozens of aged and graying monuments, making it a tempting target two nights ago.

It was one of nearly 40 historic monuments toppled or broken by vandals in the cemetery, where early residents of the coal-mining community were first laid to rest in wood coffins in the 1880s. (more…)

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