Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Coalfield’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 22, 1925

With representatives present from Renton and Seattle, together with mining men from over the state and the official family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the New Black Diamond Mine was formally opened last Friday, October 16.

N.D. Moore, vice-president, pulled the switch which set off the final blast breaking down the 9-foot barrier of solid rock separating the two tunnels on which work had progressed for more than a year. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 30, 1940

The stubborn fire near Hobart, twenty-five miles east of Seattle, which is believed to have been set by a firebug early last week, burned on unabated last night over an area of almost 1,800 acres of cutover land while weary crews battled to keep it within present confines.

Immediately threatened are the huge stands of virgin timber near and on Seattle’s Cedar River watershed. The flames licked their way into this first-growth timber in several spots late yesterday and only by hard work were the crews able to check their spread. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 9, 1922

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

These men who go down deep “the precious pearls to bring,” were just leaving the works when we flagged them. It was a hard job making them pose for this picture because the hot shower and the “Hot Meat” was waiting for them.

However, in order to oblige us, they stood for the monkey business—and here you are—a portion of the hard-hitting Newcastle crew of miners. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

By Eric Payne

Coal company bulletin: ‘The weakness of the trade union ...’

Coal company bulletin: ‘The weakness of the trade union …’

The world needed more energy.

Working men needed more money.

The world decided coal would suit its need nicely.

Working men decided trade unions were the means to a higher standard of living.

So the irresistible force met the immovable object—and South King County was one of the battlegrounds.

Some old men still remember the war. Today we live in small houses in North Renton, in homes nestled among the trees in Coalfield and Newcastle and Kangley, in shacks outside of Black Diamond. They were the front lines. (more…)

Read Full Post »