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Posts Tagged ‘Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, May 27, 1906

Neither the Northern Pacific nor the Pacific Coast Co. can own them in this state after the year 1908

Two come within jurisdiction of Interstate Commerce Commission, and are subject to new rate bill; only way they can avoid a violation of law is by disposing of their properties to constituent companies

By W.W. Jermane

Members of the House and Senate, who have studied the working of the Elkins amendment to the rate bill, forbidding railroads from owning coal mines, say under its provisions neither the Pacific Coast Company nor the Northern Pacific Company can continue to own coal mines in the State of Washington after 1908.

The question as to whether the Pacific Coast Company and the Northern Pacific could continue to operate their coal properties was suggested by The Times a week ago. At that time Vice President J.C. Ford of the Pacific Coast Company thought his line was exempt. Mr. Ford is now in his way East to consult President H.W. Cannon, and the coal question may form a topic of conversation. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 18, 1899

The little town of Maple Valley on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad has developed a new industry. It is that of “whiskey peddling.” The people of Maple Valley say that a man named Paul Bassen has been traveling round in that neighborhood with a valet full of whiskey flasks, peddling the fiery liquid out to customers the same way the ordinary peddler sells needles and thread. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 8, 1907

President A.J. Earling of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul gave out a statement in Milwaukee today to the effect that the St. Paul will complete the construction of its Pacific Coast line by 1909 and will be running trains into Seattle before the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens.

In connection with this announcement, Earling confirmed the report that the St. Paul has ordered the vacation of all property sold to his road in Tacoma and will immediately begin work on the terminal system of the St. Paul in that city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1908

Fifteen minutes before a train loaded with 200 passengers would have been on it, the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad bridge across the Cedar River beyond Maple Valley, fell under the burden of a coal train and plunged six cars of coal instead of the cars of human beings into the river.

Had the coal train succeeded in getting across, there is no doubt that the passenger train would have plunged into the river, still swollen by recent floods and no one knows how many lives would have been lost. (more…)

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