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Posts Tagged ‘Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad’

Originally published in the Puget Sound Electric Journal, Month unknown, 1919

By L.R. Grant

Coal Creek Mine bunkers, washers, etc.

What will eventually be one of our most important coal mine contracts was recently signed with the Pacific Coast Coal Company. It provides for all electrical power requirements of the briquetting and coal-crushing plants at Briquetville, near Renton, the mine at Coal Creek, near Newcastle, and the mine at Issaquah. The new contract will supersede the old contract at the briquet plant at once, and later on our existing contract at Issaquah. The rate is our regular rate for coal mines, Schedule C-15, Tariff No. 10.

The briquet plant and the mine at Issaquah have previously been described in the Journal. Coal Creek Mine is about five miles northeast of our Renton substation in a direct line, and about three miles east of Lake Washington, on a branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway. The town of Newcastle, where most of the miners live, is less than a mile northwest of the mine. This coal field was one of the first to be developed in the State of Washington and has been worked almost continuously since its first opening. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, May 26,1902

Franklin coal mines

Franklin coal mines

W.G. Hartanft, county superintendent of schools, has made arrangements for the teachers to spend a day at the Franklin and Black Diamond coal mines. These mines are situated just at the entrance of Green River Canyon, among delightfully interesting scenes of the Cascades.

The excursion train will leave from the Ocean dock at the foot of Washington Street, Saturday at 8:30 a.m., and all the teachers and their friends are invited. The fare is $1 a round trip. This is one-half the regular fare. Mr. Hartanft suggests that rubbers and a mackintosh will be necessary in going through the mines.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 25, 1906

James Sampson, a 13-year-old schoolboy at Kennydale, nearly caused the wreck of the Columbia & Puget Sound railway train near that place Tuesday afternoon by placing a hard wooden wedge on one of the curves to see what the passenger train would do when it hit it. When the locomotive hit the wedge it jumped some two feet, but luckily the train did not leave the rails. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 28, 1907

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Piledriver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Pile driver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

When one of the greatest common carriers of the country announced its determination to extend its line to the Pacific Coast, with Seattle as its terminal, excitement waxed for the customary nine days and then waned. During that time the land through which it was foreordained the road must pass advanced enormously in value, changed hands countless times, and finally became stably established in price on the market.

The advent of the great road was more or less a matter of futurity, the public was too busily occupied with the immediate present to concern itself with the future and the activities of the road were forgotten. But while the public has neglected to take cognizance of its operations, they have nevertheless been productive of results.

Armies of workmen are scattered along its roadbed for hundreds of miles, its construction work has now been extended to practically the outskirts of the city and it be only a matter of a few months before the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul again commands the attention of the public by sending its first train over the completed road to Seattle.

At Maple Valley, twenty-two miles from Seattle, the construction work has been going on rapidly. The railroad’s efforts are centered on the seven miles intervening between the intake of the Cedar River water system and Maple Valley. Beyond the intake the operations are confined almost entirely to clearing the right of way to North Bend, where the road is also engaged in construction work on a large scale. (more…)

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