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Posts Tagged ‘Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 26, 1893

Thomas Griffiths, a Welshman, who has been working for Thomas Price on a ranch on the Cedar River, was cut in two by a coal train near Eddyville station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, between 12 and 1 o’clock yesterday morning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 13, 1887

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

The logging industry in the heart of the county has of late been receiving some attention. A few months ago George Ames put in a camp at Maple Valley post office, at the fourth crossing of Cedar River, on the Cedar River extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and is now getting out about 10,000 feet of logs a day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 1, 1906

L.H. Curtis

L.H. Curtis

Len Curtis has been railroading in the Northwest for so long that he blushes like an old maid when he finds that he has been betrayed into reminiscences of pioneer days.

He doesn’t deny that he is now the oldest railroad conductor running out of Seattle, but he doesn’t look the part and he conscientiously explains that people think he is a liar when he talks about things so long ago. Besides that one or two close relatives are the only persons in this part of the country who know how old he really is and they have instructions not to tell anybody until the stone-cutter is ready to go to work on his tombstone.

Curtis is the energetic little man whom everybody calls “Len” as he hustles them on board the Columbia & Puget Sound flyer every afternoon down at the Pacific Coast Company’s depot, and who knows the price of coal, eggs, and logs all the way from Black River Junction to Black Diamond better than the natives themselves. (more…)

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