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Posts Tagged ‘Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 13, 1887

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

The logging industry in the heart of the county has of late been receiving some attention. A few months ago George Ames put in a camp at Maple Valley post office, at the fourth crossing of Cedar River, on the Cedar River extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and is now getting out about 10,000 feet of logs a day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 1, 1906

L.H. Curtis

L.H. Curtis

Len Curtis has been railroading in the Northwest for so long that he blushes like an old maid when he finds that he has been betrayed into reminiscences of pioneer days.

He doesn’t deny that he is now the oldest railroad conductor running out of Seattle, but he doesn’t look the part and he conscientiously explains that people think he is a liar when he talks about things so long ago. Besides that one or two close relatives are the only persons in this part of the country who know how old he really is and they have instructions not to tell anybody until the stone-cutter is ready to go to work on his tombstone.

Curtis is the energetic little man whom everybody calls “Len” as he hustles them on board the Columbia & Puget Sound flyer every afternoon down at the Pacific Coast Company’s depot, and who knows the price of coal, eggs, and logs all the way from Black River Junction to Black Diamond better than the natives themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 27, 1902

Luoma, born in Finland in 1870, was a laborer at the Lawson Mine. Date of the photograph at the Black Diamond cemetery is unknown.

Luoma, born in Finland in 1870, was a laborer at the Lawson Mine. Date of the photograph at Black Diamond cemetery unknown.

Erik Luoma, a laborer, about 30 years of age, was run over and fatally injured in the Columbia & Puget Sound railroad yards at Black Diamond at 10 o’clock last night.

The engine and train crew of passenger train No. 1 which had finished the passenger run was making up a special freight in the yards, when the accident occurred. The engine was backing with a string of cars when Luoma was seen sitting on the track a few yards ahead of the engine. He was apparently asleep and the engine struck him before it could be stopped. He died a short while afterwards as a result of the injuries.

The body is held at Black Diamond awaiting instructions from the coroner, who was notified this morning. Deputy Coroner Wiltsie went to the scene of the accident this afternoon.

Luoma was a Finlander, who lived with his wife and child at Osceola. He is supposed to have been drinking yesterday and not knowing what he was doing sat down on the track and went to sleep. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1913

franklin-fire-1913FRANKLIN, Thursday, June 26 — The hotel building belonging to the local coal mining company and twenty-one frame dwelling houses were destroyed by a fire that started here at 2:30 o’clock this morning. The loss to the hotel and contents is about $16,000. The extent of the loss to the other buildings has not been determined.

The origin of the fire has not been learned but it is thought to have started on the second floor of the hotel. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1906

Chief Engineer James Anderson of the Pacific Coast Company has been instructed to prepare estimates of cost for double-tracking the line of the Columbia & Puget Sound between Seattle and Black River Junction. The work will be done immediately. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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