Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 16, 1884

On Saturday the Cedar River extension was completed to the Black Diamond coal mines. These are the mines owned by D.O. Mills, P.B. Cornwall, and others, and machinery will be rushed in just as soon as possible.

The Black Diamond Company has expended over $100,000 in developing this mine already, and expects to be shipping coal to San Francisco very soon.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 23, 1894

Engineers at work and narrow gauge to be widened very soon

A party of engineers under A.A. Booth is in the field revising the line for the extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad to a connection with the Northern Pacific near Palmer, which is known as the Palmer Cut-Off, and it is understood that, while no official information on the subject can be obtained, the construction of the road will soon begin and be very soon followed by the widening of the Columbia & Puget Sound to standard gauge.

It is understood that this step has been hastened by the traffic connection between the Northern Pacific and the Burlington, the latter road wishing to save mileage and time in running trains to and from Seattle, its chosen Pacific Coast terminus, by avoiding the roundabout trap by way of Meeker. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »