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Posts Tagged ‘Columbia River’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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