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Posts Tagged ‘company store’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 16, 1923

Holiday declared and mine will close for day

All roads lead to Newcastle next Saturday, August 15, where on that occasion the first aid and mine rescue teams of Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle will contest for honors, the wining team to have the privilege of representing the Pacific Coast Coal Company at the International First Aid Meet in Salt Lake City on August 26, 27, and 28.

To give everyone an opportunity to take part in the festivities in connection with the meet, the company has declared the day a holiday, and the mines, company stores, and other activities will be closed all day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 2, 1923

When the photographer for the Bulletin last Thursday asked a group of Newcastle boys how many of them expected to attend the Elks’ big picnic in Woodland Park the next day, every one of the bunch answered with an emphatic, “I do.”

Because there are but thirteen boys in the picture shown above, it doesn’t necessarily indicate that was the size of the Newcastle delegation, which in fact totaled thirty-five, out of a possible thirty-four figured on by Welfare Director R.R. Sterling. The boys you don’t see in the picture were home hunting up the overalls with the biggest pockets and fewest holes, in which to stow away the promised peanuts.

Every boy in the picture is looking just like he did when President Harding stepped up to say “Howdy” at the picnic. At least that’s the way the photographer asked them to look. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 19, 1923

Another instance of what is being done constantly all over the Northwest to sell the products of the Pacific Coast Coal Company mines is shown in the cut above. This shows a booth arranged by the Pacific Coast Coal agency in Everett at a Household Appliance Show a short time ago.

Note the slogan, “We Can Make It Hot for You,” and below the grate filled with burning Diamond Briquets. In a briquet guessing contest conducted by the company in connection with the exhibit, more than 1,800 contestants entered, most of who made good prospects for business. Charles O. Hilen is the manager of the Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1983

By Herb Balanger
Times South bureau

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center In Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number In the group belonging to the railroad.

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center in Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number in the group belonging to the railroad.

A group of volunteers from the Association of King County Historical Organizations has been hard at work since March trying to preserve what Mike Saunders, archivist, considers “the most comprehensive countywide local history photo collection in the state.”

The work, being done at the Regional State Archives in the former Sunset Junior High School in Highline, will probably be completed in September. Saunders said.

The job involves going through 70,000 to 90,000 negatives from the county assessor’s files dating from a Works Progress Administration project of 1936–1940, in which all the real property in the county was inventoried. Additional photos were taken through 1973 updating the changes to the buildings. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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