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Posts Tagged ‘company store’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 30, 1923

When Dr. Edward T. Devine, member of the United States Coal Commission, visited the coal mining districts of the West last week, he spent one day on a tour of the mines in King and Pierce counties.

In the group above he is shown at Burnett with a number of Pacific Coast Coal Company employees, who, with Vice President N.D. Moore and Manager of Mines D.C. Botting, accompanied him on his visit to Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett, as well as to Carbonado and Wilkeson. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 16, 1923

Holiday declared and mine will close for day

All roads lead to Newcastle next Saturday, August 15, where on that occasion the first aid and mine rescue teams of Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle will contest for honors, the wining team to have the privilege of representing the Pacific Coast Coal Company at the International First Aid Meet in Salt Lake City on August 26, 27, and 28.

To give everyone an opportunity to take part in the festivities in connection with the meet, the company has declared the day a holiday, and the mines, company stores, and other activities will be closed all day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 2, 1923

When the photographer for the Bulletin last Thursday asked a group of Newcastle boys how many of them expected to attend the Elks’ big picnic in Woodland Park the next day, every one of the bunch answered with an emphatic, “I do.”

Because there are but thirteen boys in the picture shown above, it doesn’t necessarily indicate that was the size of the Newcastle delegation, which in fact totaled thirty-five, out of a possible thirty-four figured on by Welfare Director R.R. Sterling. The boys you don’t see in the picture were home hunting up the overalls with the biggest pockets and fewest holes, in which to stow away the promised peanuts.

Every boy in the picture is looking just like he did when President Harding stepped up to say “Howdy” at the picnic. At least that’s the way the photographer asked them to look. (more…)

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