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Posts Tagged ‘company store’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 17, 1924

Visitors to Burnett invariably exclaim about the beauty of the camp’s surroundings and its neat and well-kept residences. The view above, taken from the water tower, gives a glimpse of the east side of the camp. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 10, 1924

Recently the Bulletin photographer succeeded in holding a group of men ready to board the man trip for a shift in Black Diamond Mine, by promising that the picture obtained would be published in the Bulletin. The gang of husky appearing miners and underground workmen seen above was the result. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 27, 1923

Herewith the Bulletin publishes the first picture made public of the new Primrose tunnel at Newcastle, which only recently was completed to a distance of 650 feet where the new coal seam was reached.

Three shifts of gangway and counter driving will now be kept continuously on the development, and according to estimates, the new opening will be producing coal in commercial quantities by the early part of next fall.

In the foreground of the picture can be seen John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines; E.L. Fortney, fireboss; Paul Gallagher, former superintendent at Newcastle; and D.C. Botting, manager of mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 20, 1923

Another year has rolled by and we are again privileged to express our sincere wishes for a Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to every member of the Pacific Coast family. That the Yuletide may bring to each of you the full joy and happiness of the season is our earnest hope. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 13, 1923

Constant reference to the Newcastle “Spirit” has made that camp famous among the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

But while other camps may lay claim to equal or superior reasons for fame, Newcastle boasts one asset which no other camp has as yet put forth.

It is the five generation family shown [to the right].

Reading from left to right, seated: Mrs. M.A. Hayes, great-great-grandmother, and next to her, Mrs. S.F. Curnutt, great-grandmother.

Standing at the left is Mrs. Ula Hyatt, grandmother, and at her side, Mrs. H.W. Rounds, mother, with her daughter, Ellen. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 6, 1923

During the month of October, when the mines broke all known records in the production of coal, the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Wenatchee depot turned in one of the best months in its history.

The view above shows the yard office at Wenatchee, with George Glann, veteran of 17 years, and the yard foreman, standing near the entrance. H.H. Boyd is the agent at Wenatchee, and his aggressiveness is resulting in the wide distribution of this company’s product throughout that district. (more…)

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