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Posts Tagged ‘company store’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 17, 1924

Bidding against the competition of eastern firms, the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, recently won the contract for the building of the Test Weight Car shown in the above engraving.

The car weighs 80,000 pounds and is used jointly by the states of Washington and Oregon for the testing of railroad scales. The body of the car is composed of two castings running lengthwise, each of which weighs 17 ½ tons. The name plate just over the wheel in the center of the picture reads, “Built by Pacific Coast Eng’r. Co., Seattle, Wash.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

Because of the steep pitch of the main slopes in some of the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company it is necessary to use covers on the cars in which the coal is hoisted to prevent it being scattered along the slope on the way to the tipple.

In the picture above is shown a new type of cover invented and patented by W.B. Walker of Newcastle. This cover is so designed that it telescopes along the side of the car when not in use. The picture shows the cover folded back and also covering the loaded coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 27, 1924

Burnett may be a long way from Glasgow, but you’d never know it when the Scotch of the camp start out to celebrate the birthday of the immortal bard, “Bobby Burns.” The picture reproduced above shows a quintet that helped make the welkin ring at the last celebration.

From left to right they are: Mrs. Thos. Taylor, Mrs. Fred Hobson, James Blair, Mrs. James Blair, and Mrs. Robt. Wallace. Two others, Mrs. H.A. Doddrell and Mrs. John Burt, also participated in the program but were unable to be in the picture. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 20, 1924

For many years fruit growers in the Yakima Valley of Washington and in the Rogue River Valley of Oregon have contested the supremacy of Jack Frost during the blossoming season.

At first smudge pots were used to produce a dense screen of smoke, but lately it has been demonstrated that heat, and not smoke, is needed to check the ravages of the frost. For this purpose Diamond Briquets have been found to be the most efficient and effective fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 13, 1924

Quality first, whether it be Holstein dairy cattle or Black Diamond coal, is the policy pursued in Everett by C.O. Hilen, district sales manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Everett is the metropolis for the rich dairy country of Snohomish County, and in the attractive window display shown above, Mr. Hilen stresses very graphically the importance of quality. Though hardly distinguishable in the above halftone, the scene depicts a diminutive milker seated on a Diamond Briquet by the side of the life-like cow at the left. (more…)

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