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Posts Tagged ‘Covington Creek’

Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Summer 2012

By Ken Jensen

This photo, taken in 1948, courtesy of Jack Sperry, shows his father, also Jack, driving a Zipper speedboat on Lake Sawyer.

This photo, taken in 1948, courtesy of Jack Sperry, shows his father, also Jack, driving a Zipper speedboat on Lake Sawyer.

Have you ever sat through one of those vacation slide shows with a friend or relative? You know what I’m talking about … the lights are down low and you’re desperately trying to keep your eyes open while feigning interest at the same time.

Well, this was not one of those times.

Keith Watson, Bob Dobson, and I were captivated when we met Jack Sperry at the museum to see his family’s photos of Lake Sawyer.

I couldn’t imagine a better way to view the evolution of the lake from logging camp to rustic resort cabins to an upscale bedroom community. And it didn’t hurt that Jack’s parents were pretty handy with a camera. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2011

By Craig Goodwin

A recent photo of the Lake Sawyer weir—a small overflow dam used to control the lake’s outlet to Covington Creek.

A recent photo of the Lake Sawyer weir—a small overflow dam used to control the lake’s outlet to Covington Creek.

Have you ever wondered why Lake Sawyer has a weir at the outlet to Covington Creek?

In the 1940s, lake discharge was a natural outlet with logs, brush, or even a beaver dam controlling flows and lake levels. A real estate developer, Vern Cole Realty, wanted to reclaim part of the lower “boot” of the lake for additional lots. To do this, though, would require lowering the level of the lake. Therefore, Vern Cole Realty removed these natural discharge structures and the lake level fell. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Sportsman, December 1904

By J. W. Bussey

Much has been said and written on fishing for bass in various sections of the United States by close students of the life and habits of this game fish. Thus the vagaries of the bass are well known. When he is feeding he will take any form of living bait, among the best being the grasshopper, minnow, frog, crawfish and many others. The best live bait perhaps is the live tadpole, which bass devour ravenously.

Changing from bait to the fly we find that there is no limit to the vagaries of the bass for he changes quickly from one to tbe other, in fact there is no one certain fly that you can rely upon. He will take one fly one day and another tomorrow; and he will keep on changing from day to day. (more…)

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