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Posts Tagged ‘Covington’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 11, 1998

Tacoma utility, state ecology agency reach agreement

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

After trying to circumvent legal roadblocks through the state Legislature, Black Diamond is in line to receive some of the water needed for future growth.

A tentative agreement in principle reached recently outside Olympia between Tacoma Public Utilities, the state Department of Ecology, and the City of Black Diamond could provide 500,000 gallons per day for five to 10 years. (more…)

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A ritzy development cuts a deal to take water from Puget Sound cities and endangered salmon

Originally published in Seattle Weekly, March 5, 1998

By Chris Carrel

The DOE insists taking more of the Green River’s scarce water for a golf course won’t hurt its struggling salmon.

The endangered-species listing proposed last week for Puget Sound chinook salmon served official notice that Pugetopolis’ sprawl-as-usual is incompatible with healthy salmon runs. In response, legislators pledged serious salmon-recovery legislation for next session.

A proposal in the current session to divert water from salmon streams to luxury homes in southeast King County has highlighted the difficult politics of balancing development with salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 24, 2009

By Kathleen Kear

Community members and guests filled Black Diamond Community Center where they enjoyed a kickoff event celebrating Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary of being a city. — Photos by Ron Olness.

Quickly running through their regular city council meeting agenda on Thursday, February 19, at the Black Diamond Community Center, Mayor Howard Botts—along with Mayor Pro Tem Rebecca Olness and Councilmembers Goeff Bowie, Bill Boston, Leih Mulvihill, and Kristine Hanson—turned his attention to the kickoff event that will begin a year-long celebration of Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary as a city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, February 19, 1998

Bill would give Black Diamond permit it has been denied 3 times

By Leslie Brown
The News Tribune

Black Diamond development: Black Diamond Associates’ 1,600-home development would sit on 750 acres recently annexed by the city. The project is on hold because the city doesn’t have enough water. (Ronnie Ashlock/The News Tribune)

After failing at every level to obtain a water permit for 1,600 new homes in Black Diamond, developers finally have found a sympathetic and powerful ear in the Legislature.

A bill that would give the City of Black Diamond a “temporary” water permit—the very one the state Ecology Department denied developers three years ago passed the House 55-42 last week. It is now pending before the Senate.

Critics are decrying House Bill 2800, sponsored by Rep. Jack Cairnes (R-Covington) as special-interest legislation, bad water policy, and an end-run around a three-tiered administrative process that gave the developers ample review.

“This bill is not really intended to secure a (water) supply for the existing population of the area,” Ecology Department water resources manager Keith Phillips wrote to the House Agriculture and Ecology Committee. “Rather, it is intended to secure a supply for a large, new land development nearby.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 18, 1998

Pending rate increase would provide funds for much-needed improvements, say city officials

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

Dan DalSanto scans the surrounding landscape after returning from a trip across the Green River over a suspension bridge that carries Black Diamond’s water supply. (Photo by Paul Schmidt)

For years Black Diamond officials have postponed most major improvements to the city’s water system, firm in their hope they would eventually tap into a new, high-capacity, Tacoma-owned water line.

Money spent for a larger reservoir and related components would be redundant, especially with the long-planned Pipeline 5 in the future, its route designed to cut through the middle of town.

So went the thinking, says Public Works Director Dan DalSanto.

Pipeline 5’s future is now in some doubt with the endangered species listing of Puget Sound Chinook salmon. But having waited all these years for the pipeline to arrive, Black Diamond finds itself with a water system fast needing improvements and expanded capacity. (more…)

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5-year project to put life back into Franklin

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 11, 1994

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times South bureau

Lindsay Larson leads a group of students through the old cemetery they are cleaning up. Many of the deaths were caused by mining accidents. (Jimi Lott, Seattle Times)

HISTORIC FRANKLIN—Hidden beneath the maples and cottonwoods of the Green River Gorge are secrets unseen by the casual visitor.

Some of those secrets are a little more visible today than they were yesterday, thanks to eighth-graders from Cedar Heights Junior High School in Covington. (more…)

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