Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Covington’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 19, 2006

By Kathleen Kear

Tax relief for Black Diamond’s businesses may soon be in sight. The Black Diamond City Council voted unanimously Thursday, Dec. 7th, to phase out the business and occupation tax by 2010.

The city will reduce the tax each year until 2010, when the B&O tax will be completely repealed. Black Diamond’s B&O tax rate is the highest in the state at 0.5%. The city’s B&O tax affects manufacturing, retail, services, and wholesale business. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the South County Journal, December 16, 2002

By Dean A. Radford
Journal Reporter

Some King County Council members are having second thoughts about transferring Lake Sawyer Park to the city of Black Diamond.

Larry Phillips, chairman of the council’s budget committee, wonders whether the city can fulfill the county’s vision to turn the 165 acres into a regional park similar to Redmond’s Marymoor Park. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 16, 2006

By Cara Solomon

Black Diamond is something of a holdout in South King County, a rural enclave that stayed the same while sprawl consumed the cities around it. (Greg Gilbert/The Seattle Times)

Black Diamond is something of a holdout in South King County, a rural enclave that stayed the same while sprawl consumed the cities around it. (Greg Gilbert/The Seattle Times)

A developer’s purchase of nearly 1,600 acres of land has one of King County’s quietest communities preparing to boom again. But visions of a city with rural flavor don’t come without some trepidation. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 14, 2006

By Danny Westneat
Seattle Times staff columnist

BLACK DIAMOND — If you ignore the cars parked to the side of Railroad Avenue, this main street of King County’s last small town looks much like it did 100 years ago.

Only it’s less bustling.

There’s a 104-year-old bakery, still making bread in the same wood-fired brick oven. The old coal-mining company store houses a book shop. There’s an Eagles Lodge, and the train depot is a museum. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 16, 2005

A Garrett Tree Farmer invented by Dwight Garrett became well known all over the world for its ability to quickly remove logs in tough terrain while doing minimum damage to the young growth and root systems. Photo from forest industries, February 1966 reprint, courtesy of Black Diamond Historical Society.

A Garrett Tree Farmer invented by Dwight Garrett became well known all over the world for its ability to quickly remove logs in tough terrain while doing minimum damage to the young growth and root systems. Photo from forest industries, February 1966 reprint, courtesy of Black Diamond Historical Society.

Making a huge impact on the Enumclaw/Black Diamond area from many years, businessman, inventor Dwight Garrett, 89, passed away in Enumclaw on Thursday, August 4, 2005.

Born in Black Diamond on May 28, 1916, Garrett spent his growing up years running up and down the streets of the town. His grandparents Fred and Susannah Hughes Garrett came to the United States in 1900 from South Wales with their four children.

With relatives of Susannah’s living in the Covington, Wash., area, the couple decided to make their home near Hughes Lake while Fred worked in the Black Diamond mines. Saving a 12-mile walk to work each day, the Garretts later moved to the town of Black Diamond.

One of their two sons, David, worked in the Wales coal mines at the age of nine as a pit boy as well in the mines in Black Diamond as a young man. He also worked for the company store as a clerk along with driving the delivery wagon. Later he moved to Morganville where he ran a small grocery store and gas station. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The News Tribune, August 13, 1997

Move to annex Lake Sawyer would add 2,000 residents from high property value area

By JC Conklin
The News Tribune

Rick Luther, Black Diamond city administrator and police chief, overlooks Lake Sawyer. A move is under way for Black Diamond to annex the Lake Sawyer area. (Dean J. Koepfler/The News Tribune)

Rick Luther, Black Diamond city administrator and police chief, overlooks Lake Sawyer. A move is under way for Black Diamond to annex the Lake Sawyer area. (Dean J. Koepfler/The News Tribune)

In the 38 years it’s been a city, Black Diamond’s population has hovered around 2,000.

But if a proposal to annex Lake Sawyer wins approval, Black Diamond’s population would double overnight.

The owners of 60 percent of the property in Lake Sawyer, based on its assessed value, have signed a petition asking to be annexed into Black Diamond. Residents of Black Diamond will have a chance to voice their opinions at a City Council meeting on Sept. 6. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 12, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Mayor Howard Botts

When one thinks of mayors, the names Rudolph Guiliani, Paul Schell, or Marion Barry are likely to come to mind. Political influence, intense media exposure, and controversial issues often follow these municipal leaders. However, these big-city, high-profile men do not represent your average mayor in Suburbia, USA.

The mayors for Black Diamond, Covington, and Maple Valley do not have grandiose political aspirations. Rather, they are mere citizens who want to lend their time towards making their respective town a place where families, businesses, and community can thrive.

Despite his long-standing history within the city of Black Diamond, Howard Botts is none the least bit pretentious. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 10, 2013

By Dennis Box
Editor

After years of planning and hard work the Black Diamond Coal Miners Memorial was unveiled Saturday during the city’s Miners Day celebration.

The honor garden memorial includes a 13-foot bronze statue sculpted by Ellensburg artist Paul Crites and a 28-foot granite wall, engraved with the names of miners who have died in mines throughout Washington state. Engraved bricks are at the base of the statue and wall. Surrounding the memorial and historical museum is a landscaped garden.

According to Black Diamond Historical Society President Keith Watson, the idea for the memorial began years ago, but started in earnest about two years ago when he and former Black Diamond Mayor Howard Botts, and their wives made a trip to Roslyn, Wash. They saw a Roslyn coal miners memorial and that was the inspiration. (more…)

Read Full Post »

After it makes an emergency landing on Highway 169

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 30, 1994

By Cheryl Murfin
Valley Daily News

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a 'miracle' landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a ‘miracle’ landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

BLACK DIAMOND — Jerry Everett expects to see disabled vehicles when he pulls into his repair shop each morning. But he expects them to be automobiles, not airplanes.

Wednesday morning, he arrived to find a single-engine plane parked in his lot. It had been pushed to the side of the building by the plane’s pilot, assisted by patrons of a tavern next door, after an emergency landing on Highway 169 near Southeast 311th Street.

According to Black Diamond Police Lt. Kevin Esping, the Cessna 175’s pilot maneuvered around numerous utility lines to land on the narrow, two-lane road about 10 p.m. Tuesday. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 17, 1996

By Mike Archbold
Valley Daily News

BLACK DIAMOND — A committee of Lake Sawyer area residents is hoping to tie the knot with the city of Black Diamond.

Whether Black Diamond will say yes and nearly double its 2,000 population is debatable; annexing purely residential areas like Lake Sawyer can be expensive. Providing city services can cost more than the tax money generated.

On the other hand, City Administrator Rick Luther said, adding a recreation area like Lake Sawyer could be a plus for the city. And the area already is serviced by water and sewer districts. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »