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Posts Tagged ‘dancing’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

There are no ships or sealing wax, no cabbages or kings, but shoes plus a multitude of other items are now on display and for sale at “Funky and the Damn Near New.”

Located next to the Morganville Tavern in Black Diamond, Funky is the brainchild of owner Steve Novotny. He describes it as a second-hand store and pawn shop, intended in part to meet the needs of low-income families in the area. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1923

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

With “Sailor” Leap’s kayo of Battling Morales in the last minute of the first round of a scheduled four-round go and Jimmie Forbes’ easy victory in the second round over Ernie Dorman in the main event on the card, the fans who packed the house at the smoker given by the Black Diamond Athletic Club last Saturday night seemed well satisfied with the show.

Another knockout was scored by “Cougar” Coutcher, second for “Kid” Brundage, when he splashed some Sloan’s Liniment in the eyes of Brundage and so blinded him that the bout had to be called off before the battlers had even a chance to shake hands.

The smoker opened with a battle royal in which five Black Diamond huskies went to it hot and heavy. Ernest Buchanan, otherwise “Kid Montana,” emerged the victor, according to the decision of Referee Nas Matt, whose judgment was endorsed by the crowd. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 1, 1923

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

Drawn by Chas. Butkus

That the smoker scheduled for Black Diamond next Saturday night, February 3, is going to be a record-breaker, both in the crowd expected and in the excellence of the bouts, is generally conceded. In addition to the main event, a six-round tangle between Ernie Dorman of Black Diamond and J.J. Forbes of Issaquah, there are six other battles on the program.

All rounds will last for two minutes each, and with the exception of the main event the bouts are all of four rounds.

Because of an injury suffered by Len Berry in an accident this week, he will not be able to meet his brother, Bill Berry, Jr., in a four-round exhibition bout. His place will be taken by H.A. Noah, who promises to give Bill a run for his money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 23, 1922

Boys of Burnett who keep the wheels rolling.

Boys of Burnett who keep the wheels rolling.

Naturally, at every camp of the company there are arguments regarding which department really produces the coal but the men in this picture refuse to argue. They know there would be little coal produced if they were not on the job—installing, repairing, and replacing machinery and equipment. (more…)

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